Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 82

Thread: Nero is limping :(

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,057

    Default

    there are lots of ortho - braces for cruiciate damage front or back. Not so many for hips / elbows...

    there's this sort for around $65 and another sort which looks more complicated from orthopets and you have to make a leg cast and send off..
    Thera-Paw Tarsal Wrap, Splints and Rehabilitative Dog Products : TopDogs

    https://www.backontrackproducts.com....ck-brace-pair/

    Dogs In Motion Canine Rehabilitation

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    948

    Default

    We are back to square 1 About four weeks into our 'no run regime'we haven't seen any change in his limping. Since he came off the anti inflammatory, it's been very much the same as before: when he gets up after resting, not putting on much weight when standing, having his hind leg slightly extended....

    So yesterday we went to see friends for Christmas Lunch. They just live down the road and own Neros littersister. We haven't seen much of his crazy sis lately because she and Rox don't get on. Anyway, she is doing exactly the same thing! Limping when getting up, it's worse after chasing the ball excessively, not putting weight on left hind leg but holding it slightly extended when standing...! They even walk the same way! I figure, chances that they both rupture their cruciate ligaments on the same leg at the same time is rather slim. So I think the Vet must have gotten it wrong...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    We are back to square 1 About four weeks into our 'no run regime'we haven't seen any change in his limping. Since he came off the anti inflammatory, it's been very much the same as before: when he gets up after resting, not putting on much weight when standing, having his hind leg slightly extended....

    So yesterday we went to see friends for Christmas Lunch. They just live down the road and own Neros littersister. We haven't seen much of his crazy sis lately because she and Rox don't get on. Anyway, she is doing exactly the same thing! Limping when getting up, it's worse after chasing the ball excessively, not putting weight on left hind leg but holding it slightly extended when standing...! They even walk the same way! I figure, chances that they both rupture their cruciate ligaments on the same leg at the same time is rather slim. So I think the Vet must have gotten it wrong...
    Personally I would be getting a referral to an ortho vet. I take extended limping seriously with my dogs. If both siblings have straight stifles and heavy they may both be prone to a similar issue. The litter sister of one of my dogs started limping the same time my dog did. Turned out they both have HD.
    I did the conventional with my dogs cruciate for awhile but ended up in surgery. I was reluctant to let it go for an extended period to minimise damage to the joint. Also a ruptured cruciate is painful.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 12-26-2014 at 04:33 PM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    948

    Default

    MMJ... do you know whay causes Brocks limping?

    Ortho vet... Thanks kalacreek. I didn't even know such a thing exists

    I ruptured my cruciate ligament on my left hind leg too... many years ago and couldn't walk at all because it was so painful. And I still remember very vividly that surgery was one of my worst experiences ever. It felt as if someone had smashed my left knee with a large sledgehammer. Repeatedly. It took many months to heal and years later my knee is still (or again) loose and prone to injury. So I wouldnt be comfortable putting him through surgery unless his limping gets worse.

    But anywho... Thinking of his sis I'm don't really believe in the CL theory anymore anyway. Maybe it is rather hip related after all and I think we need to check this out further. So many thanks for the ortho vet tip.
    Last edited by margoo; 12-27-2014 at 09:38 AM.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,057

    Default

    Margoo

    some doctors are better at ACL repair than others...

    My knee with acl repair is actually slightly tighter than the other one. And I still get pain there. Sort of remembered pain but it works much better now.

    And smash knee with large sledge hammer is very close to what they do - so it's no surprise that knee ops are one of the most painful ever - post op. My second op - before I went in - I had a long discussion with the orthopod and the anaesthetist about pain management and I got a morphine pump so I could administer as much as I needed in a limited way (not more than one dose every five minutes and it was a limited dose).

    That worked well for me. The first op I had - the bitch of a night nurse - outright refused to give me any pain killer at all. And then complained that I didn't sleep.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,302

    Default

    Knee surgery in humans has come a long way. A friend of mine just had a full knee construction and he has been fanatical in his rehab and it feels great. Pain was bad only for a short while.

    Cruciate surgery in dogs obviously carries risks if there is an infection or the recovery period is not adhered to. My girl had bilateral cruciate surgery and she sailed through it. I was extremely vigilant with her recovery and she was back doing agility in 5 months. There are several different methods of surgery. For my girl it was a darn sight better than being permanently crippled. She had no problems at all on her legs when she passed at age 14. What often happens with a partial cruciate is it will suddenly totally rupture and then surgery is inevitable. I like to get surgery done before too much arhtritis sets in.

    I wouldnt let your experience put you off cruciate surgery for your dog if he needs it. For my girl it improved the quality of her life out of sight.

    Your description pretty much fits what I observed with my girl. Worse after exercise, holding it out slightly, she was often toeing when standing. However a good ortho vet should pretty well sort out the problem. With hip problems they often have a slightly weird gait where they can bunny hop.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 12-28-2014 at 02:51 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    948

    Default

    This is a different decade but I know 2 people who had pretty bad experiences with anaesthetics during surgery. They were basically immobilised, yet could still hear and feel (!) everything going on. I didn't think the compensation they got was worth the risk, so I opted for an epidural for my knee surgery. Which was fine, but when they started hammering and drilling away on my knee I realised that nobody properly prepared me for what was to come and that I was in for a nasty shock when the epidural wore off. And so was it. And yeah, the fact that the bitch nurse let me beg for painkillers didn't help.

    The thought of having to put Nero the wuss through something like this makes me cringe. This is Nero, who acts as if his paw comes off when he has a tiny cut and who cannot walk one step further if a grass seed pinches his belly. Each grass seed I pull out I have to present for inspection because he needs to know what exactly has caused him this unbearable pain. An ant bite last summer resulted in a full week of sulking, licking and limping.

    So once they have surgery, do they have to stay at the vet for a few days? Or can you take them home right away?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,302

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by margoo View Post
    This is a different decade but I know 2 people who had pretty bad experiences with anaesthetics during surgery. They were basically immobilised, yet could still hear and feel (!) everything going on. I didn't think the compensation they got was worth the risk, so I opted for an epidural for my knee surgery. Which was fine, but when they started hammering and drilling away on my knee I realised that nobody properly prepared me for what was to come and that I was in for a nasty shock when the epidural wore off. And so was it. And yeah, the fact that the bitch nurse let me beg for painkillers didn't help.

    The thought of having to put Nero the wuss through something like this makes me cringe. This is Nero, who acts as if his paw comes off when he has a tiny cut and who cannot walk one step further if a grass seed pinches his belly. Each grass seed I pull out I have to present for inspection because he needs to know what exactly has caused him this unbearable pain. An ant bite last summer resulted in a full week of sulking, licking and limping.

    So once they have surgery, do they have to stay at the vet for a few days? Or can you take them home right away?
    From memory my girl stayed in overnight and then I picked her up. She came home with plenty of painkillers but she is a stoic dog and never gave any indication that she was in pain. I had to restrict her for 6 weeks while the bones healed and she was very over that. I then spent another 12 weeks getting her back to full strength but the results were so good I don't regret it and we went through the process twice as she had both her knees repaired a few years apart. Often if one goes it is very likely so will the other down the track.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,057

    Default

    Oh Margoo - if you'd seen what they do to make an epidural work - you'd never have one of those if you didn't have to. OMG the size of the needle and where they have to put it - the risk is paraplegia and infection in the spine.

    I've heard of some really bad things happening with General Anaesthetic too - I think the main thing is not to get a student or learner doctor doing it. They can learn on someone else as far as I'm concerned.

    With vets - you want to make sure that someone is dedicated to making sure the dog keeps breathing - while the vet just concentrates on the op. The specialist vets would have the resources to do that every time.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SA
    Posts
    948

    Default

    We went back to the Vet today for another issue (he is scratching himself bloody - poor pup does not have a good run at the moment!) and I used the chance to make a few more enquiries about surgery. The last days - after our encounter with his sis - our 0 run regime was somewhat loosened, although it didn't completely went out of the window. But even a little bit of running around has resulted in his limping getting quite a bit worse. It just sucks!!

    What happened to Neros sis couldn't sway our Vet's professional opinion. He says it's a quite common condition, and many dogs have a (faulty) bone structure that is prone for this kind of injury - so there may well be our family connection. There may also well be the second knee at risk : ( In any case we're now officially considering surgery. He said they wouldn't do it themselves, which is a bit of a bummer. I was hoping Nero could at least be comforted by a few familiar faces. They would refer him to another place in town, the 'Adelaide Specialist and Referral Centre' was named. Does anyone here happen to have experience with these guys?

    So now I'm thinking I better start preparing. This dog has never set paw into a crate - but he'll need to post OP. I was thinking of one of these plane-proof plastic crates, rather than a mesh one because they have a bit of a 'cave' feel and he likes caves. Is there anything important to consider on crates? Something I need to avoid at all cost?

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •