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Thread: Shaving dogs - blog post about why you don't shave dogs with undercoats.

  1. #1
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    Default Shaving dogs - blog post about why you don't shave dogs with undercoats.

    Hi all

    8 Reasons Why NOT To Shave Your Dog | ekcgrooming

    Just in case you need some good reasons to back you up when someone wants to get their border collie or husky shaved.

    It's a little bit unclear about what you should be doing with the wooly coat dogs like poodles.

    But the main point is about not shaving GR, GSD, BC, Aussie Shepherds, Shelties etc.

    I think even if part of the coat needs to be removed for an operation - shaving the rest of it is not a good idea.

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    Awesome link, thanks for sharing!
    Poodles (and other wooly coated breeds) can be shaved just like shih tzu's, malteses' etc etc.

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    My parents have a golden retriever and they shave her in summer.. She's 10yrs old (on Sunday) and will lay around feeling sorry for herself every summer until she is clipped.. Then she has the energy/happiness of a puppy again. Her coat grows back looking like a normal GR coat and she is never cold in winter (they do live on the Sunshine Coast.. She might if they lived somewhere colder). Dad read an article similar to this last summer so they didn't clip her.. She was such an unhappy dog and ended up putting on quite a few kgs as she was just too hot to exercise - she was clipped again this summer. Yes, she gets hotspots but that is only when she gets wet and doesn't completely dry (mainly in winter) and I don't think that's related to clipping as she has had them since a puppy - way before she started getting clipped.

    I don't think there is a 'straight' yes or no answer on clipping dogs - it really depends on the individual. To me it seems cruel if my parents dog doesn't get clipped during summer and I think she happiness she shows when she is clipped is enough proof that they should keep doing it for her (but not necessarily their next dog)

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    Kristy, there are exceptions like your parents dog. Some dogs do okay when they are clipped. But personally, i wouldn't risk it and I definitely wouldn't ever clip a clients double coated breed unless it is for a medical reason, or the dog is very elderly and clearly not coping in the heat or weight of fur. I have seen so many dogs with double coats that have been shaved and their coat hasn't grown back properly. I've seen ones where it grows back in patches, some ares long and some really short, and the quality of the fur is absolutely terrible, brittle and rough to the touch. I've also seen the opposite, where the coat grows back ridiculously thick, with HEAPS of undercoat, it matts so much easier when it is that thick... not to mention that on the dogs who's fur grew back thick they also had terrible coat condition. I've also noticed in a lot of shaved dogs that their skin seems flakey and they have a lot of dandruff. I think part of owning a double coated breed is maintaining their coat and looking after them in extreme temperatures. I know a person who has three samoyeds, she doesn't shave them and they coped fine through a recent 40+ degree heatwave that lasted a week. Koda also coped fine through the heatwave (outside the whole time). His summer coat is pretty similar to a Golden Retrievers, maybe slightly thicker. But i just provided him with cool water to lay in and ice blocks and he was as pretty content In my opinion when you buy a long double coated breed you are committing to maintain their coat just like you commit to train the dog and keep it healthy.

    Oops... i kinda started ranting here didn't i...
    But yeah, i guess what i'm saying is that some dogs do okay shaved, but I wouldn't risk it with the number of dogs i've seen whos coats have been wrecked from it
    Last edited by maddogdodge; 02-27-2014 at 10:31 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristy.Maree View Post
    My parents have a golden retriever and they shave her in summer.. (snip) Dad read an article similar to this last summer so they didn't clip her.. (snip)
    I don't think the article argued that you should clip or nothing.

    The year that Dad didn't clip - did he get the coat "stripped" (undercoat plucked out) instead? Or does he use regular brushing and maybe a furminator rake brush?

    As best I can tell GR need a lot of coat care - clipping or not. They need to be brushed to get the undercoat out when it's hot. Clipping damages the top coat and water proofing. If brushing a pug can stuff a cushion, the same thing for a GR will stuff a queensized mattress - every week.

    So if they didn't clip and they didn't brush enough - I'm not surprised the dog was sad when it got hot. But if they're not up for the brushing - then maybe - for this dog - the clip is the best option.

    I brushed Frosty this morning - because she's shedding - again... sigh. Probably enough to make some nesting birds happy. The fur and some house dust bunnies are now out in the back yard.

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    The amount of hair that comes out of Koda when he's shedding could easily fill a large doona cover, its ridiculous. You make a good point about the brushing Hyacinth, if I didn't strip out Koda's undercoat in preparation for summer, he would suffer a lot, and all the dead hair would make his fur matt up really bad.
    I brushed Dodge for the first time a couple of months ago. With her Alopecia, her hair is so thin that there has been no point in brushing, she has only undercoat on a lot of her body. One day during shedding season i noticed a small tuft of hair coming out of the back of her back leg (one place where her fur is relatively normal with both top and undercoat), so i decided to get a really fine flea comb and try brushing there. I couldn't believe what came out of her legs! Could have easily filled a pillow!!
    I was talking to my mum about shaving dogs today and she reminded me that she and my dad used to shave our old BC mix, Oscar. I don't have heaps of memories of Oscar because i was quite young when he died, but now i think about it i do remember him being shaved. She says that because he was just a working farm dog, they couldn't be bothered to brush him and maintain his coat so in summer he got really matted, so to keep him cool they just shaved him all over, head and tail included. I guess if the person is not going to maintain their dogs coat in the first place then shaving would be a better option for the dogs wellbeing... but i'm still of the firm belief that if someone owns a long haired dog they should take responsibility and maintain it the way the coat is supposed to be, whether thats done at a groomer or done themselves

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    She gets brushed with a furminator every day after her walk so it's definitely not that the hair that comes out is unbelievable!

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    Quite a few Border collie owners I know clip their old dogs very close in summer. Not shaved down to the skin but very short. These are show Borders with very thick heavy coats and get regular coat care through their lives. The relief is almost instant on the faces of these old dogs and they seem freer and happier. They grow their coats back in winter to be clipped short again in summer. There doesnt appear to be any problem. It is mainly done on old dogs by the the people I know.

    I clipped my big coated BC in summer to reduce grass seeds etc and she always seems to breathe a big sigh of relief and runs around a lot more. I dont clip her real short and leave quite a lot of length except her pants which I take off her back legs and her stomach and chest. She always grows back normally. She is now living in the city so doesnt really need it now.

    I have had several dogs have major surgey over the years and had a very large area shaved - like the whole back leg or large area on their flanks and the coat has always come back normal as far as I can see.

    Having said that, I would tend not to clip unless I had to and then only if the dogs was old and clearly distressed by the heat or was at risk of penetrating grass seeds. My current dogs are all short coated deliberately so I dont have to entertain the thought of clipping
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 02-28-2014 at 01:37 PM.

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