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Thread: Jack Russell is becoming incontinent?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    ACT, Australia
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    1

    Default Jack Russell is becoming incontinent?

    Hi there.
    I have a 12 year old Jack Russell terrier, who I believe is starting to show signs of incontinence and I am needing some tips on how to handle this effectively.

    I live in a small, 2 bedroom apartment which she has slowly become accustomed to - after living in the bush/suburbia for the past 8 years I have owned her.

    I've noticed her bed smelling like urine, and she has started using the carpet as the place to go now.
    I walk her of a morning, as I get home and before I go to bed.

    We don't have a backyard, and she doesn't respond to the fake grass pads.

    Is there anything I can do to help her through this? She is already a very timid dog, and having her shy away from me when I come home because she has had an accident is heart breaking.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

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    Take her to the vet and see if she needs something like Stilboesterol tablets which is basically like hormone replacement. Can be common at that age, conversely she could have a bladder infection from the stress of moving.

    If she gets a clean bill of health then look at a puppy pen on a tiled area when you are not there to supervise and use something like Urine Off or Biozet to wash the carpets to remove the proteins in the carpets that are drawing her back there. For the fake grass dab a tissue in her wee and leave it on there to attract her

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
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    2,636

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    I have a dog with incontinence and I control it using Propalin syrup. This is a non hormonal treatment and I syrynge the recommended dose onto her food everyday. She has a congenital incontinence since a puppy and has been on it for the last 6 years without any side effects and it has been 100% effective.

    But as mentioned a trip to the vet is important to determine the cause. My mothers 13 year dog showed similar signs but hers was a urinary tract infection. If it is not an infection then I personally would look at trying either Propalin or the hormonal drug mentioned. I personally found that having tried both I was much happier with the non hormonal med Propalin although from memory it might be a little pricier, not sure on that one. It will sometimes depend on the dog as both can have potential side effects.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 10-18-2013 at 12:06 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
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    3,082

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    Propalin has side effects of increased risk of stroke. From high blood pressure. As long as dog's blood pressure is fine, its fine.
    another side effect can be loss of appetite. so its abused by anorexics.
    and another effect is if you cook it up, you can make Methamphetamines from it, so it's become a regulated product, though it was once an 'over the counter'.

    but aside from that, it actually aids the old baggy eurethra, to tone up! and the sphincter can then close tightly, and the incontinence is treated.
    How's your dog coping with pee-ing indoors? My old dog was very distressed at his peeing indoors. It broke my heart to see him like that.

    how about some crate training, for managment and as a excellent house training regime?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
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    2,636

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    Quote Originally Posted by bernie View Post
    Propalin has side effects of increased risk of stroke. From high blood pressure. As long as dog's blood pressure is fine, its fine.
    another side effect can be loss of appetite. so its abused by anorexics.
    and another effect is if you cook it up, you can make Methamphetamines from it, so it's become a regulated product, though it was once an 'over the counter'.

    but aside from that, it actually aids the old baggy eurethra, to tone up! and the sphincter can then close tightly, and the incontinence is treated.
    How's your dog coping with pee-ing indoors? My old dog was very distressed at his peeing indoors. It broke my heart to see him like that.

    how about some crate training, for managment and as a excellent house training regime?
    Yes both propalin and stilboestral can have side effects. I didnt like what I read about stilboestral as it has known to be carcinogenic and can cause bone marrow supression particularly if it has to be given in increasing dosage. This is what happened to an old dog of mine many years ago, she needed ever increasing dosage of stilboestral to keep her continent so I took her off and put her on psuedoephedrine over the counter from the chemist which had much better results.

    My current dog had to be put on medication since she was 12 weeks old and I decided that stilboestral was too risky to be used over such an extended period.

    No issues with blood pressure and my dog has an appetitie like a pig - typical cattle dog LOL. Propalin can indeed have side effects such as restlessness, lethary inappetence etc but none of those have manifested in my dog so I prefer it as an option. Again vet advice was followed. My specialist surgical vet recommended that the Propalin option was best in my particular situation.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 10-18-2013 at 06:47 PM.

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