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Thread: What do you think about the quality of vet care in Australia?

  1. #11
    Join Date
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    Hi Hyacinth, does that mean that I can have both my dog sites in the signature as long as their is no other test around them just delimeters, or do I wait for a mod to modify them?
    No - no advertising without Morgan's approval in posts or your post signature, not plain text or links or pictures. You can use it for a personal catch phrase - I'm fond of "it's on the internet, it must be true".

    Your profile page is not the same as your post signature. You (as a person posting in Australia and contributing to the forum) can put what you like on your profile page (as long as it meets the other forum rules), and when people click on your user id, they will see what you put there. There is a field there for "home page url". And some more for "biography".

    See the private message from me for more details.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by LovelyDog View Post
    Hi Kalacreek. The only addition I would suggest about a dog nutritionist, is what credentials actually make such a person? If they qualify as a vet can they automatically become one? Because from what I understand (and happy to be corrected) I dont think vets spend a lot of time on nutrition or dog behaviour/ fitness/ requirements for socialisation in their studies. I think they are still mostly taught on a medical stream, to fix things that are broken and need repair, not on keeping dogs well. I wonder how many dog nutritionists are true raw feeders, and how many sell their man made wares? It would be dangerous to come out of vet school and be a person who was anti manufactured dog food, when most vets can make a substantial part of their sales from such products.

    You also mention "diet of mix of grain free kibble" if kibble has maybe 20% meat in it, and no grain, what is it made of then? Vegetables? I honestly dont know.

    "quarantine rules will be guided by research and solid scientific fact" I think this is another interesting debate. Many people in this OTHER forum (not a specific dog forum) said that Australia is full of dog diseases and we should not be so precious. I dont see how 'scientific fact' can tell you that a new disease wont be created, and that its incubation period wont be more than ten days. The counter argument to this is that incubation could be 40 days or a year, so they suggest there is no safe quarantine period so you may as well have none.

    I thought quarantine was about the safety of the dogs already in a country, and new comers and new dogs had to respect that. If science, vets and immunology specialist can tell me that we are now so clever that 30 days is just way over cautious and anything that will occur to dogs in the future will happen in the first then days, then I am happy to call them Gods. Swine flu, mad cow disease, animal aids and a few other nasties came 'out of no where'. If this statement is 'scaremongering' and FUD, then i apologise. I just don't see how 20 less days (when a dog may live to ten plus years minimum) is a bad price to pay for keeping the dogs already in a country safe (or safer) now, and for most future possible outbreaks. For this I was told that I don't care about humans and other pets, and that I am a dog walker who cant comment because I am not a vet. The forum moderator then proclaimed that no on in there should use my services, because I dared to speak out against the political push to lower quarantine standards (days). Yes the attack was mighty personal and what I would consider a rant (considering I started the thread with a positive assertion valuing dogs lives)?!

    I don't always think that science & research and projected outcomes are always taken into full consideration when a decision becomes political. But that is just me.
    There are vets who specialise in dog nutrition, There are a number of speicialist veterinary fields available which include surgery, skin, heart, orthopedics etc. I know one who specialises in diet and nutrition and really tailor makes diets to suit the problem and one who specialises in trigger point therapy and physio as she does a lot of our sport dogs and is fab. I dont think you have to be a raw feeder to have healthy dogs, not in my experience with my working sheepdogs anyway. Grain free kibble has meat meal (named as lamb chicken, beef or turkey) and fish meal as its first couple of ingredients, with chicken fat, whole egg, potatoes and fruit and vegies making up the balance. 38% potein and 20% fat. Very protein dense.

    30 odd years ago coming froma country like Africa you used to have to send your dog to the UK for a year and then another 6 months in Australia. I am quite sure they have incubation times for a major disease like rabies and would also be well aware of the risk profiles of the country that the dog is coming from.

    Most quarantine practices are simply based on a risk assessment. Nothing is 100% fail safe but it can go a long way to reducing the risk. There would be significant knowledge about incubation practices that would be set to reduce the risk to a very low level.
    For example they may know that for a particular disease an incubation of 10 days occurs in 99.5% of all cases, but in 0.5% of cases it may take 6 months. Do they quarantine all animals for 6 months? They would probably look at the country of origin and say well the cases of that disease are almost neglible so then 10 days will cary a very low risk factor. If the dog was coming from a country where the incidence was high then they may decide that 6 months would be appropriate. As far as dogs are concerned I would imagine rabies would be the most concerning diesese to keep out.


    If new problems are created then we have to handle them as best as we can, based on the information available and that is not always going to be perfect as it often takes time and money to gather that information. It is not really possible to set a standard incubation for disease you dont yet know about. I mean incubation could be a year, 2 years or 3 days, or an animal could simply be a carrier, shedding the organism but not being affected.

    Australia is free of a number of significant diseases that could hit our export markets and economy hard so I think we do need to take it very seriously.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 04-30-2013 at 03:40 PM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
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    Well all i can say is that my vet is excellent....all the staff love my dogs and they talk to me like i'm a friend not a customer....the girls who work the counters are soooo friendly .

    The vets themselves go to great lengths explaining anything i ask about. Diagrams been drawn on whiteboards....computers showing me pictures....TV's with slideshows going all the time..etc, etc. I've had diets drawn up for me and many,many phonecalls after the most basic of visits just to see how things where going.

    I also get given options on how to tackle problems....financially. Not paying the bills but "if we try this, we might not need this afterwards...so you wont waste money on that "etc,etc...

    I even had money refunded to me when Scooby died.

    I took in some very expensive medication and told them to give it to anyone who needed it free of charge. The had no hesitation in giving me what the medicine was worth in either cash or credit. They are the best IMO.

    From Puppy school to Cremations.....they have helped me with every aspect of my dogs health.
    So what do i think of qualiy of vet care in Australia ?? Well from what i've seen its excellent. I'm sure there are bad vets out there but i havnt dealt with them.....the bad vets in Bundy more than likely got jobs in our Base Hospital (Patel..Dr Death etc)

    After all this preaching about how good they are to me i'm going to give them a plug....

    Eats Bundaberg Veterinary Hospital.... David or Randall....both are very ,very good vets/surgeons.

    East Bundaberg Vet Hospital, Animal Health Professionals Striving for Excellence


    Last edited by Sean; 04-30-2013 at 05:42 PM.


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  4. #14
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    Apr 2012
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    I think we are lucky to live in a country with such a high standard of veterinary care.
    There are gaps in their basic education which isn't the fault of the students. Luckily there are other vets who have learned a lot during their professional lives.
    At the end of the day it's up to pet owners to be as informed as possible before making big decisions about their animals, the same as they would about their own health.

  5. #15
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    What is it about being a vet that makes all their hair go white and fall out on top of their heads. That one looks almost exactly the same as my club president vet.

  6. #16
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    Toowoomba, QLD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    What is it about being a vet that makes all their hair go white and fall out on top of their heads. That one looks almost exactly the same as my club president vet.
    My vet looks the same too!!


    I can not speak highly enough of my vet clinic, they are part of a big chain but the individual vets there are really excellent. This morning I was sitting at the dining table doing some uni study (for the record- vets do spend A LOT of time on nutrition (3 subjects in my first year!) and behaviour, fitness, socialisation etc.). Anyway, our cat was jumping onto the table, which he's not allowed to do. I was armed with my spray bottle and was spraying him with water every time he jumped up, and he would jump straight back down. Then he jumped onto the table again, I grabbed my spray bottle, he saw it and did this massive flying leap onto the railing above our staircase.. problem is, the railing is round and slippery, so he fell right off.. fell down the entire 5m (highest point of the stairs) and landed on his right-hand side on the tiles.

    He couldn't move his hip/right leg, wasn't making any noise at all and was in a lot of shock. I quickly wrapped him in blankets and rushed him to our vet, they took me straight into a consult room, ahead of everybody else that was in the waiting room and gave him a very thorough examination, we were in there for almost 45 minutes and he spent forever checking his hips were okay, he checked he hadn't ruptured his spleen or diaphragm, checked all his teeth were okay, just a very detailed exam. Thankfully he thinks that he was a very lucky kitty and didn't do any major damage, just a lot of bruising so he gave him a metacam injection and sent us home and it only cost $80! He couldn't stop laughing about how it happened though (time to move the dining table). I know a lot of vets that would have probably forced us to have x-rays and a lot of other tests, kept him in there for 'observation' and would have charged a fortune for such a rushed visit where we put them way behind schedule for the day.

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