Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: WHen should you desex a puppy?

  1. #1

    Default WHen should you desex a puppy?

    The vets all say "get him desexed at 6 months!"
    But I've read a report by some scientist who did a study on over 3000 dogs and came up that early desexed dogs have an increased chance of bone diseases because the hormones naturally used to slow growth is removed and irregular growth occurs. What worried me further is that in the US the recommended age for desexing is 10 - 14 months for males and 8 - 9 for females. Then why does Australia want you to desex so early? I think they want people to stop getting accidental puppies but this isn't the way to do it!
    So when have you gotten your dog desexed?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,635

    Default

    This always causes many arguments. I have looked through many studies and yet to find one that really analyses all the variables particularly regarding differences between breeds, the fact that many sterilised animals are allowed to get overweight and that often the best quality dogs genetically and structurally are kept intact. Some breeds are much more at risk of certain conditions due to their build and structure and genetics. For example an unneutered labrador is proably more at risk of one of the dysplasias than a neutered whippet.

    A dog breed that is heavier built and with a tendency to be straight in the stifle is more at risk of cruciate problems than a light well angled breed like a working BC for example regardless of neutering status. A dog allowed to get fat as many sterilised animals are often allowed to become because their metabolic rates are reduced are more at risk of health problems.

    There is very little information on breed except one study that found that large dogs were much more at risk of spey incontinence and than small dogs and that there appeared to be certain larger breeds more at risk to early neutering.

    I personally spey my bitches between 8 months and 12 months and my male dogs around 22 months old. They are all medium sze dogs around 17-22 kgs and I keep them very lean and fit.

    Ove the last 40 years my family have had at least 40 medium sized dogs and the majority of them were neutered at 6 months old. All of them lived to a ripe old age with very few health problems and most were working dogs so their soundness was well tested. The one dog I had with cruciate problems was very heavy and also straight in the stifle from poor breeding. The couple of dogs that I have had diagnosed with dysplasias were diagnosed before they were neutered.

    The only 2 dogs that I have lost or nearly lost - one was an unneutered male who endlessly tried to escape when bitches from surrounding farms came on heat. After 4 years he finally did when a visting child let him out and was he shot by a neighbouring farmer. I had one bitch who nearly died of pyometra just after her first heat. One other bitch had endless phantom pregnancies so we eventually speyed her.

    There is a big responsibility to make sure that bitches on heat are contained. It just takes one slipup from a child or visitor and the next minute your dog is pregnant with all the potential problems that brings.

    Really you have to look at your lifestyle, your ability to prevent pregnancy and escape of male dogs from wandering and decide what is best for you. I had one friend whose male dog would leap over 6 ft fences when it scented a bitch.

    I think that early spey neuter before 6 months old carries a lot more risks, but often rescues and shelters are between a rock and a hard place and do it anyway.

    I just make sure that if I get a puppy it is from good quality lines and that I keep it and grow it out lean and then keep it well exercised and feed good quality food.

    So far the healthiest dog I have owned was a station bred cattle dog, speyed at 6 months old, lived to 17 with zero health problems and she had a wonderful well angled structure and she had drive coming out of every orrifice so she tested that structure to the limit. She was worked hard from a puppy, great genetics.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 01-13-2013 at 09:57 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    tasmania
    Posts
    266

    Default

    I got my bitch spayed at 5 months, she turns 13 next month.
    I just got my male desexed this week and he is 6 and a half months old.
    Unfortunately i seem to be living in a little town where people rarely desex their dogs (male or female) and half of them seem to wander around the streets.
    If you think dogs can't count, try putting three dog biscuits in your pocket and then giving Fido only two of them. ~Phil Pastoret

  4. #4

    Default

    When they have physically matured. If you are able to manage them through adolescence and some sexual behaviours. If you can't, then do it at six months.

    The push for six month old desexing is based upon controlling unwanted breeding, not on individual health benefits. If all non-breeding dogs were desexed before they were physically able to reproduce the problems with unwanted dogs in society would be hugely reduced.

    So yes, waiting for growth to finish benefits the dog. But if their sexual behaviour can't be controlled and they breed the benefit of waiting is nullified. Not so much for males, although if they start escaping looking for bitches in season they are in danger on roads etc. But if a young bitch falls pregnant there are lots of potential health risks too.

    There are pros and cons to both sides of the argument.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,789

    Default

    I personally think any time between 6 and 12 months is good. (for both dogs and bitches)
    My male was desexed at 11 months old, he's turning 3 this year.
    My Female is still entire, she's turning 9 this year.

  6. #6

    Default

    I've also heard that there are behaviour problems for dogs who are desexed early. The study showed that the most common problem in males is aggression. The most common problem in females is fearful behaviour.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,635

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CharlieandMollie View Post
    I've also heard that there are behaviour problems for dogs who are desexed early. The study showed that the most common problem in males is aggression. The most common problem in females is fearful behaviour.
    Honestly, the only dog I have ever had aggression and fear problems with was an unsterilised bitch I adopted and her fear aggression was genetic. Her father I discovered was alos fear aggressive.

    I have 2 males the same age (one is a rescue that I got talked into taking on). These 2 males butted teenage heads and the aggression was really starting to escalate, so at 22 months I had them both castrated. It very much reduced the problem. They still have the odd scuffle but nothing like the full blown aggression I was starting to see.

    I currently have 4 bitches speyed between the ages of 6 months and 12 months and there is no fear behaviour, they are very confident dogs.

    Genetics has a lot to do with fear and aggression, and also poor early socialisation. I look for good temperament in the lines I choose and I socialise my pups appropriately and I have never had a problem and I am talking 40 dogs. My friends do the same and I cant think of any of theirs being a problem.

    I have a friend that bred her fear aggressive kelpie and the pups were a complete nightmare.

    The other interesting thing is that when I used to go surfing up to remote spots with my guy friends the young guys would bring their uncastrated male dogs to the beach. They were always fighting, we called it the sand dune wars and there were vet bills. Now all much older men it is interesting to note that their current males are all castrated (probably their wives insisted) and sand dune wars is not so common and they agree life is more peaceful on the beach.

    Sometimes I wonder about these studies, many of them are based on surveys and are often very subjective. Certainly that one doesnt ring true with any of my experiences.

    What exactly do they define as early desexing?
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 01-13-2013 at 06:50 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

    Default

    Mine have all been desexed at 6 mths over the years except my GSD boy who was done at 11 mths and have had no problems. Over the years I've heard many so called "Experts" and they all have different opinions so I take no notice.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    2,789

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CharlieandMollie View Post
    I've also heard that there are behaviour problems for dogs who are desexed early. The study showed that the most common problem in males is aggression. The most common problem in females is fearful behaviour.
    As i said, my boy was desexed at 11 months. He's got quite severe issues with fear aggression, but as Kalacreek said, i would put that down to (possibly) genetics and just his general personality... very protective yet sensitive and nervous. So he tries to stand up for himself and his people, but he's really scared at the same time. As well as that i probably didn't socialise him as much as i should have when he was little.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,635

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maddogdodge View Post
    As i said, my boy was desexed at 11 months. He's got quite severe issues with fear aggression, but as Kalacreek said, i would put that down to (possibly) genetics and just his general personality... very protective yet sensitive and nervous. So he tries to stand up for himself and his people, but he's really scared at the same time. As well as that i probably didn't socialise him as much as i should have when he was little.
    So he was displaying these personality traits before he was desexed?

    My fear aggressive bitch certainly was that way before I got her desexed at 12 months old. Desexing didnt have any bearing on her personality afterwards either. It was intensive training and desensitisation that made the difference.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •