Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Osteochondritis Dissecans in Rotti pup :(

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Posts
    74

    Unhappy Osteochondritis Dissecans in Rotti pup :(

    Shelby formed a bit of lameness about 8 days ago, the poor babe
    She was in no obvious pain or distress, so I gave her 2 days to see if it got better - thinking perhaps it was just aftermath of a hard core dog park play.
    It got a slight bit better, but I still was not happy with how she was so took her for a check up at the vet. Hoping that it was a splinter in the paw, or she caught her nail - something small but easily treatable.

    The vet tells me its more than likely Osteochondritis Dissecans.
    We are on anti-inflammitories, but they seem to not being much help at all.
    And her lameness is more severe after a walk, even a small 10 minute walk on grass.

    I guess the next step is X-rays, possibly surgery (which will be done when she is de-sexxed).
    But was wondering if anyone had some natural therapies for her?

    I can't not exercise her, then we will have weight issues.

    Im also feeling like a pretty s**t pet owner, as her housing is predominantly on pavers, which i didn’t realise was such a bad thing! She is always taken to the dog park, at least 2 times a week and also 3 times a week for small walks (10 - 15 minute walks). I feel terrible, and so guilty that I may have caused this I thought of ripping up a section of the pavers so she has a grassed area, or laying fake grass - which i think she would just rip up and eat…..

    If you know of anything that I can do to help her, that would be great!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    The resources I checked all say that the only non-operative treatment does consist of immobilisation alone. In young pups (or people) that can allow the bone to repair itself. How old is your pup again? I don't think very young pups gain weight that easily? I know it would be hard, but I think it is worth a try if you want to stop the pain and try prevent the surgical route.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Posts
    74

    Default

    She is about 7 months now. how do you completely immobilise a pup? Do you mean strapping? or bed rest type immobilisation?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    I think you should ask your vet for more info. He should explain to you exactly what is happening to that bone and what the different options are and the consequences of each. I think x-rays asap would be a good idea though. And with your pup in pain, I don't think you can afford to wait with treatment, even if it is keeping her as still as possible for now.

    The anti-inflammatories could make some difference but they would only treat secondary symptoms I think. There are natural anti-inflammatories that are effective, but they take at least a month to start working, so I don't think that would be helpful here.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,599

    Default

    When they talk about immobilising in first aid - they mean put a splint on the broken bit and strap it so it can't move ie the busted bit can't move. Like an arm in plaster.

    Not sure what they mean when it comes to a lame dog. But I'm thinking a crate might be a start and no running and jumping. I agree with Beloz - ask the vet for details. Ring up, leave a message or send an email.

    Have you let the breeder know you're having problems - they might have some ideas about how to manage it and it may help them to know one of their pups has it and maybe to warn future pup owners about living surfaces. I can't think of anything much that a puppy wouldn't chew. Wooden floor boards are gentler than pavers tho. Even if you got those click together pavers or made a decking even if it's only one rail off the ground. Or you could put a thick layer of sand or sawdust down - tho that will track inside.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Gold Coast
    Posts
    74

    Default

    Im taking her for a full set of Xray tomorrow.
    But it looks like we will fully fence our front yard, ripping up the pavers could welcome all sorts of trouble and we may damage the plumbing for the pool and spa.
    Anyone know any fencers on the northern end of the gold coast?

  7. #7

    Default

    ' ShelbyTeaCup' - heaps of Good Luck Wishes for the X-rays tomorrow !

    At least you will find out what the problem may be.

    X-rays are good for bone, but not necessarily for cartilage. If there is wear and tear on the joint - then that will show up in X-rays !

    Have a look at this below:

    Disorder - Osteochondrosis dissecans - LIDA Dogs - Faculty of Veterinary Science - The University of Sydney

    Again - Good Luck !

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,638

    Default

    Best to work with your vet and get a referral to a good orthovet. OCD can occur in the shoulder or the elbow. I am assumming yours is in the dogs shoulder. I know several dogs where surgery done by an experienced surgical vet was 100% successful and one of the dogs went on to be a spectacular agility dog.

    I would think immobilisation means crate rest. Immobilising joints with splints etc can cause all sorts of problems.

    Dont blame yourself, this is a common reaction. I would also certainly let the breeder know as these sorts of problems are not uncommon in Rottis.

    The dogs I know that had OCD as pups were not housed on pavers. One of my dogs has FCP of her elbow joints and I had surgery to remove the lose bits of cartilage. The damage to the cartilage didnt show up on her CT scans but the slight remodelling of the bone did, which was an indication of very early signs of arthritis.

    Surgery was done before any major damage to the bone had ocurred and was very successfull.

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 11-20-2012 at 12:49 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Geelong, Vic
    Posts
    871

    Default

    Whoah whoah whoah, pavers do not cause this problem. Also without x-rays to panic you like this? Come on, thats not professional from a veterinarian.

    Find yourself a chiropractor and get their opinion before you dive into surgeries and all that. I had a vet tell me I needed to reconstruct my Dogue de Bordeaux's shoulder at the same age as your rottie because he was extremely lame - I mean walk 5min and not get up lame. She hadn't done an x-ray, that was her 'educated' guess. Turns out he had a bad disc in his back and he was throwing the weight forward onto his front legs, causing lameness due to uneven walking. That dog worked hard and did agility and sports up until literally the day he died there was no need to slice and dice.

    Unless THOROUGH investigation has been done as in a specialist has seen properly done x-rays please, dont go panicking at what most veterinarians say. They cannot tell just by looking and manipulating a dog unless the limb is literally hanging by a thread.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    I also think that fencing the frontyard over this is a bit of an overreaction. Unless you intended to do it anyway.

    And I agree with Nekhbet: don't sell your chickens before they hatch. See what the x-rays say and then go from there. And make sure you truly trust the vet you're dealing with. If not, go elsewhere.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •