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Thread: Staffy Over heats - suggested elongated palete

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Central Coast NSW
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    6

    Default Staffy Over heats - suggested elongated palete


    Looking some advice

    I have a 2 year old entire male English Staffy. He is a extremely muscular and weighs 23 kilo, He was given to me 8 months ago as he previous owner could not give him the attention he needs. He was raised on generic brand kibble, i was told he could not tolerant any other form of food. He is now fed on a diet of fresh meat and bones.

    Since taking him on he has had a multitude of health issues that include allergies and infections. He also caught kennel cough even though I had him vaccinated, previous owners were unable to provide any records of vaccination.

    The problem I have is that even in mild heat he overheats, he sounds like a generator panting but being a staff he does not slow down or stop. Luckily he likes water and he will lie down while he is cooled off with the hose. I can not walk him too far from home due to the over heating, he is very active and I have to limit the activity. At most he can chase a ball around the back yard for 10 minutes max.

    He is very noisy even for a staffy, when he sleeps he is snoring constantly and he continually snorts.

    First visit to the vet to discuss the overheating he was put on a course of steroids, this settled him down for a little while but was far from a cure. The vet suggested that he has an elongated palette and will investigate when he is de-sexed in the next few weeks.

    Last few weeks he is a lot worse.

    Has anyone experienced this with their staffy or breed. Is there an alternative to surgery.

    Does anyone know of a vet located in the Central Coast/Hunter region of NSW or Sydney that will desex and complete the palette surgery together as I do not fancy giving my boy a second anesthetic. At this stage my vet is talking about referring him to another vet, from what I know of the surgery a specialist is not necessary. I would prefer one vet and one surgery.

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    Last edited by Maxee; 10-16-2012 at 09:26 PM.

  2. #2

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    What ambient temperature are you finding that he overheats in? Staffies do have potential overheating issues but at this time of year, it seems wierd that he is overheating in such a short time frame. You can either manage the issue or pay for whatever tests might be necessary to try and find an underlying issue. Whenever its hot, i always take Jack(a staffy) to a beach where he can run around in shallow water(he ain't gonna win gold at the olympics for swimming) so that he can have a good run but stay cool enough to keep him safe. But it sounds like there is something else in this situation

  3. #3

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    on rilly hot days keep him in side i have exp with staffy i have owned them for years
    on hot days thay do over heat make shoure he has a mini pool and lots of cool water staffies a prone to heat stress the best way to cool them is to put them in the tub and run cool water over him for 10 to 20 mins make shore theres lots of shade staffies love the shade and never walk a dog on hot days walk them in the mornings and at nigth when it cooler cheers
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  4. #4

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    Does he ever snort and cough repeatedly? Like "reverse sneezing"? This can also indicate palette problems or elongation.

    Sounds like a good cool coat will be a worthwhile investment for you and him. Have a look online at some, he can pretty much live in them during warmer weather.

  5. #5

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    Was going to ask the same question as Natty , although further investigation will be needed in any case.
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  6. #6

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    my 3 staffies do the exact same thing. you can take them just around the corner and they carry on as though they are never going to get their breath back. 1 of my staffys even drinks after a walk then throws up. and you are right they dont stop or slow down so we dont go to far with them. and yes by god do they snore!!! they snore almost as loud as my husband! i think its a staffy thing? just short walks lots of water on offer

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Central Coast NSW
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    Quote Originally Posted by natandpoonie View Post
    my 3 staffies do the exact same thing. you can take them just around the corner and they carry on as though they are never going to get their breath back. 1 of my staffys even drinks after a walk then throws up. and you are right they dont stop or slow down so we dont go to far with them. and yes by god do they snore!!! they snore almost as loud as my husband! i think its a staffy thing? just short walks lots of water on offer
    Yes it is just a staffy thing, it comes from poor breeding (Rocky was a rescue dog) He had a palate resection Tuesday, he also has a partial paralysis of the larynx and another conditional usually seen in Bull dogs where the trachea is around 40% narrower then it should be. He no longer snores and when he pants its not a struggle for every breath. He may need further surgery to have his larynx tied back, but given his recover from the resection I won't hesitate to have it down. 4 days later he is like a new dog. I also think this has effected his ability to eat, since the surgery he is constantly looking for food.

  8. #8
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    Oct 2012
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    Central Coast NSW
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    I had a specialist surgeon travel to the coast from Sydney, he performed a palate resection on Rocky Tuesday removing 8mm of excess palate. His recovery has been fantastic. Rocky also has other problems all associated to encephalitic breeds, although some of the issues the specialist has said only occur in bulldogs. He will go on to live a long happy life with the right treatment. This comes from poor breeding Rocky was a rescue dog so I don't know his history.

  9. #9
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    I had a specialist surgeon travel to the coast from Sydney, he performed a palate resection on Rocky Tuesday removing 8mm of excess palate. He also has paralysis on the left side of his larynx which may have to be tied back somewhere down the track he also has a very narrow trachea. The surgery will go a long way to help with his overheating but because of other issues he will never be 100%. will be looking for a coat.

  10. #10
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    Central Coast NSW
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    Rocky had a palate resection Tuesday to reduce the length of his palate, the results have been immediate even with the expected swelling he no longer snores all night and travels quite comfortably in the car. I was worried the resection would result in his ability to snort but he is still able to snort his utter disgust at me when his manipulative ways fail to work. He will never be 100%, the beach is the best place for him but like Jack he wont be winning any races for swimming either the first time I took him to the beach he jumped in and sunk lucky for me someone jumped in after him. I am just happy that surgery will give him back some of the things he enjoys the last 4 months have been really hit and miss on how much exercise is too much.

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