Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Scissors...

  1. #1
    macca691's Avatar
    macca691 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Brookvale, NSW
    Posts
    59

    Default Scissors...

    Hi Guys, i was wondering if there was a dog groomer on here that could give me some advice.
    I am wanting to buy a pair of scissors to use on the dogs.
    Can i just use human hair dressing scissors or is there a difference between dog and human ones?
    They will be used for around the feet and just general tidying up.
    As for the feet i was looking at the curved scissors, could i use the curved ones for other parts like ears face etc or should i also but a pair of straight?
    And i was also reading about the serrated ones (not thinning shears)- is it true they better then the plain ones as they keep the hairs from slipping while your cutting therfore ending up with a straighter cut?

    Thanks in advance for your help.
    Cheers.
    "No matter how little money and how few possesions you own, having a dog makes you rich." - Louis Sabin

  2. #2
    GreysAreGreat's Avatar
    GreysAreGreat is offline I'm Baldy's Biatch!
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Hawkesbury, NSW
    Posts
    2,001

    Default

    I only use straight scissors, but that's what I'm used to (I have a few friends who groom full-time and they only use straight as well). If you have hairdressing scissors they will do the job for what you are talking about. Main thing is they need to be nice and sharp! Your normal bog standard household scissors won't give a nice finish.

    Like hairdressing, dog grooming scissors can range from around $100 up into the thousands (yep, I held a pair last year that were worth $1500!). Full-time groomers will usually spend about $400-500 on a pair of scissors as they stay sharp for longer and they are using them all day. Look at Shear Magic scissors, they are reasonably priced.

    I'd suggest going for a shorter blade as they are easier to work with if you're not used to using them, and I find them better to do feet with.

    In My Home Dog Minding
    www.greyhoundrescue.com.au

  3. #3
    macca691's Avatar
    macca691 is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Brookvale, NSW
    Posts
    59

    Default

    Thanks Greys..I was planning on getting a short blade pair as i thought that would be the case.
    Just hoping someone has has some experience with the serrated ones and can tell me wether they are worth getting or not.
    You can pick scissors on ebay quiet cheap.
    I am atm trying to find some info on how to clip the top knot on dex's head-it is like a mow hawk-very cute but looks quiet untidy.
    I don't clip him all over so i am thinking if i use clippers it is going to look odd. So thinking scissoring with thinning shears is the go but just have never done it, so if anyone can give me some suggestions on where i can learn this, like grooming dvd's, websites etc that would be great.
    Cheers
    "No matter how little money and how few possesions you own, having a dog makes you rich." - Louis Sabin

  4. #4
    Nattylou's Avatar
    Nattylou is offline Sighthound Devotee
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,778

    Default

    I do very little on mine but use thinning scissors when I do so that the trimmed bits blend in nicely. I was shown by my breeders so don't have a good reference.

    But a couple of tips are: less is more, do a little bit each day rather than hack off a big bit and regret it, always trim from behind the direction of coat. So this is one that helps trimmed bits to lie flat and blend well. If the hair is growing back under the neck, put the scissors in underneath and trim a little. Comb out the bits and have another look. Then go again as you need to.

  5. #5
    miss jayne is offline Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Middleton SA
    Posts
    85

    Default

    i am a groomer thinning shears r great would be perfect for what u want to do, look up dog grooming on you tube there are a lot of videos on grooming, i use mainly straight scissors, curved are good when grooming poodles, have never used the serated scissors, good luck

  6. #6
    Crested_Love's Avatar
    Crested_Love is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    2,103

    Default

    Old thread I know but...

    Don't skimp on the cost of scissors. They are expensive for a good reason.
    I have a pair of $100 scissors here and they are pretty good, not great, but they do the job.
    I have a $450 pair of scissors here that are my babies.. granted they are made out of titanium so they are rainbow colored (the main appeal lol), but they have never lost their sharp edge, they are as sharp today as the day I got them out of the box.

    Curved scissors are an acquired taste. Ask a lot of people who show poodles and they will tell you that you need a pair of curves. I personally don't like them, I find them too hard to use... gimme a pair of straights any day.

    Oh, and don't use the scissors on human hair... same with clippers, it's blunts them twice as fast.

  7. #7
    hachna's Avatar
    hachna is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    808

    Default

    Hi

    I know this is very late post. I groom my dogs by myself as well. I get the most information from Youtube. Macca you will find Spanialmom's clips on youtube very useful even you just want to do in between job for your dog. Good luck

    Hachna
    I love cooking but I love eating even more.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •