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Thread: Ticks - Start Looking

  1. #1

    Default Ticks - Start Looking

    Just a quick reminder to all out there that tick season is well and truly arriving. Even down south we've seen some grass ticks so those on here that are in the warmer climes of QLD and northern NSW please be on the lookout.

    Don't forget to check between toes and inside mouths if doing physical checks for paralysis ticks. My mum lost her beloved Golden Retriever to a tick on the inside of her lip...

    Tick products are better than ever but nothing beats a good old going over every day or so. Your dog loves all the attention anyway!!

  2. #2

    Default

    Nattylou..

    Thankies for the reminder...
    Over the last 14 yrs of owing dogs, mine have been lucky not to get any type of ticks & that's a good thing considering that we live in semi-rural region & i've walked my dogs in long grass, parks that are adjacent to cow/ horse paddocks etc, i've always used frontline every month on my dogs & i do check everyday for ticks.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Aussie land :)
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    Default Nice one ;)

    Thanks for the reminder, Nattylou!

    Oh that's a shame. More the reason to look out for ticks I guess.

    Very true, nothing better than a good going through, although I'm lucky down in sydney, you don't get too many ticks.

    Cheers,
    Charlie
    ~Charlie~
    Busta the apricot poodle x spaniel
    http://www.the-organic-mind.com

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by *Dogluver* View Post
    Thanks for the reminder, Nattylou!

    Oh that's a shame. More the reason to look out for ticks I guess.

    Very true, nothing better than a good going through, although I'm lucky down in sydney, you don't get too many ticks.

    Cheers,
    Charlie

    Charlie, please be careful as we do get ticks in Sydney

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    NSW
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    203

    Default

    this is a scary thought for me, but at least our Millie dog has a very short smooth coat, and i have used Advantix on her.. i will be checking.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Aussie land :)
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    Default

    Hey Floyd,
    I am aware and I am on the lookout of course
    I was just saying that we are lucky as they are more common in northern NSW than down here.

    Cheers,
    Charlie
    ~Charlie~
    Busta the apricot poodle x spaniel
    http://www.the-organic-mind.com

  7. #7

    Default

    I would not have a clue what I would be looking for....I don't think ticks are a concern though in Melbourne???

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Moggill, Queensland
    Posts
    697

    Default

    If we miss one, what are the symptoms to look out for?

  9. #9

    Default

    Hi All

    i just found out this info about ticks from my fav vet site

    Tick Paralysis Prevention
    Introduction | Identification | Symptoms | Treatment | Prevention | Vet Comments
    Introduction

    Paralysis ticks (Ixodes holocyclus) are among the most dangerous parasites that can affect your pet. It is estimated that over 75,000 dogs and cats are paralysed in Australia each year and unfortunately, many die. We sometimes refer to this paralysis as tick poisoning.

    This leaflet is designed to give you a better understanding of paralysis ticks plus provide information on how to protect your pet against them.

    Where Do We Find Paralysis Ticks?


    Ticks Map

    The paralysis tick is found on the eastern seaboard, from North Queensland to Northern Victoria. It is not always restricted to the immediate coastline but can be found a long way inland in suitable habitats. In the northern parts of Australia, paralysis ticks may be found all year round, while in the southern areas, the season begins in spring and finishes in late autumn.

    Paralysis ticks are found on animals that live in or near thick bushland.

    Native animals such as marsupials, birds and reptiles are the natural hosts (especially the bandicoot, which has strong immunity against the tick's toxin). Ticks can also become attached to dogs and cats.
    How does the tick cause Paralysis?

    The tick sucks blood from the host animal and secretes saliva that contains toxins which are absorbed and cause signs of paralysis and poisoning.
    How to Identify the Paralysis Tick

    Once on the animal, the tick finds a site of attachment where it becomes deeply and firmly embedded in the skin. When an adult tick feeds on blood, it increases in size dramatically. When a tick attaches to the skin, the area becomes red and a raised thickening or "crater" may appear. A crater is evidence of a prior tick attachment.


    Adult Tick 1-2mm long


    Engorged Adult Tick >3mm long


    Paralysis Tick, Bush Tick, Cattle Tick


    Symptoms of Tick Paralysis

    If your dog or cat lives in or visits a high risk area for paralysis ticks, it is important to look out for the symptoms of paralysis. Symptoms of poisoning may occur up to 5 days following the initial tick attachment.

    The symptoms to watch for are:

    * Loss of coordination in the hind legs
    * Change in voice or bark
    * Retching, coughing or vomiting
    * Loss of appetite
    * Progressive paralysis to include the forelegs
    * Difficulty breathing or rapid breathing

    Not all cases follow a simple progression and the animal can die suddenly in the very early stages of paralysis.
    What To Do If Your Pet Shows Symptoms Of Tick Paralysis

    1. Keep your pet calm, in a cool, dark place until you take it to your vet.
    2. Do not offer food or water, as this may lead to pneumonia and breathing difficulties if your pet can't swallow properly.
    3. Seek veterinary attention as soon as possible.

    At the vet:

    Your veterinarian can give your pet an anti-toxin to help in recovery. The antitoxin (or serum) is expensive since it comes from dogs bred for their immunity to ticks. Other specialised procedures such as sedation and treatment for respiratory complications may be vital for your pet's complete recovery. Your pet will probably require hospitalisation for several days.
    How to Protect Your Pet from Paralysis Ticks

    a) Avoid the tick habitat
    During the tick season, don't take your dog walking in bush areas known to harbour large numbers of ticks. Keep lawns and shrubs short and remove compost material from backyards.

    b) Search pets every day for ticks
    The most essential preventative measure is a thorough search of your pet's skin and coat every day, even if tick control products have been applied. This method gives you 2 or 3 chances of finding a tick before serious tick paralysis occurs, since the tick must generally be attached for at least 3 days before causing paralysis.
    Be systematic with your search.

    Use the fingertips to feel through the animal's coat. Ticks or tick craters can be felt as lumps on the skin surface.

    * Start at the animals nose and slowly examine the face, ears, lips and eyes.
    Most ticks are found forward of the front legs, especially on the face, neck and ears, however be careful of skin folds around the lips and ears
    * Search around the eyes and on top of the forehead carefully before checking the neck
    * Remove collars and search through the skin folds in the neck. Continue down the shoulders to the forelegs; remember to check between the toes and under the armpits. Examine the chest, back, belly, around the tail and anus and the back legs.

    tick removal with hook

    If you find a tick, remove it (see section c) and don't forget to search for more. Some dogs can be infested with many ticks at one time.

    c) Remove ticks
    As soon as a paralysis tick is found it should be removed as soon as possible. Quickly remove the tick without squeezing the engorged abdomen. Your vet can do this or show you the best method. A special hook or tweezers may be useful.

    d) Preventatives for paralysis tick control
    In addition to daily searching, application of products specifically intended for tick control can greatly reduce the risk of tick paralysis for your pet.
    You should ask your vet for their recommendation.

    Two products which are widely used for flea control also have good activity against ticks. These are FRONTLINE Plus and FRONTLINE Spray.

    If a tick attaches, FRONTLINE will begin to take effect immediately and the tick will die and fall off 24-48 hours later.
    Frontline Spray

    FRONTLINE Spray should be used every 3 weeks for dogs and cats. The spray should be applied over the whole body but take special care to rub some around the head, neck and legs using rubber gloves.

    FRONTLINE Plus should be used every 2 weeks on dogs.

    While FRONTLINE will greatly reduce the risk of tick paralysis, use of the product does not guarantee prevention of all cases of tick paralysis because ticks are not killed immediately after contact. It is therefore essential that you continue to search your pet daily after FRONTLINE applications. If ticks are found during this search they should be killed or removed immediately.

    Please talk to your vet about the best ways to protect your pet from tick paralysis.

    Ingleburn Veterinary Hospital
    Last edited by Aussie Floyd; 10-04-2009 at 08:33 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Aussie land :)
    Posts
    40

    Default

    Hey Floyd,

    Top-Class info! You (in my opinion) are one of the forums top contributors, thanks so much. I hardly new anything about ticks until you posted that! I think you have answered many peoples questions about ticks even just in this thread.

    Maybe you could ask Morgan to leave it on sticky for a few weeks since we are coming into summer? If you want.

    Thanks for the post,
    Charlie
    ~Charlie~
    Busta the apricot poodle x spaniel
    http://www.the-organic-mind.com

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