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Thread: 7 Month Tibetan Spaniel - Needs a trim

  1. #1
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    Mar 2015
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    Question 7 Month Tibetan Spaniel - Needs a trim

    Hello,

    I am new to this forum and I am mainly seeking out some advice for trimming my 7 month old male Tibetan Spaniel.

    Louie's coat is starting to get long and I understand that they are a low maintenance dog breed, but I am just not sure what to do in regards to trimming him.

    He gets regular weekly brushes and 2-3 week washes but I am finding that the coat on his tummy and around his testicles mat very easily. Obviously his coat around his bum is long but I don't feel comfortable with clipping/trimming him myself. I would hate for something to go wrong.

    My other issue is that if I take him to a groomer, would they know what needs to be trimmed? As in, I don't want them to trim his overcoat as this is needed to keep him warm during winter. Tibetan Spaniels aren't very popular here in Perth so I am concerned that if I do take him to a groomer, they will trim everything.

    Would anyone have any advice? Is grooming with clippers fairly easy? I think seeing as I am nervous about it, that I probably shouldn't do this myself cause I still want him to look cute.

    Thanks,
    Auriana

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Hi Auri

    Have you asked the person you got him from if they can recommend a groomer near you? Maybe one willing to teach you?

    A groomer should have a breed book full of pictures for every breed - with the "show coat" and with the every day look - so you can see what they're aiming for when they do a clip. You probably want to at least crutch him (the bit around his bum so he doesn't get dags). A pair of short scissors should do this fairly easily.

    Also if you brush him more often you might find he doesn't matt up as much.

    I like rubber curry combs you can get from equestrian supply shops.
    http://www.caribuhorsewear.com.au/ru...ing-brush.html

    I know it's hard to find a good groomer because anyone can say they are a dog groomer and charge for that. I take my dog to a groomer to get her claws trimmed. This particular groomer is better at claw trimming (even black claws) than your average vet because she's much better at talking a dog into doing what she wants without force or drugs. But she's in Adelaide. Not much good for you.

    Maybe you could do your own research about how your dog should be groomed (as the breeders) and then go into a groomer, discuss it with them (get photos from the breeders if you can), and stay there while they groom your dog. If they're not ok with you staying with your dog - then don't do business with them. I think that's how things can go wrong sometimes - ie the owner trusts the groomer to do the right thing and it all goes to hell. At the same time you don't want to be so fussy they can't touch your dog. There's a balance. My job with the claw trim - is to keep the treats going and report on dirty looks from the dog (she needs a break). It's not to baby the dog, hold her on the table or reward her for "dirty looks".

    There is one regular member here who works as a groomer who might be able to help at least point you at someone good near you. Just be patient.

  3. #3
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    I assume I am the regular member who is a groomer that Hyacinth is talking about...

    I've never groomed a Tibetan Spaniel, they're not very common. They are not a breed that is supposed to have the hair on their body clipped at all. Neatening up the paws and hocks is common, but clipping or scissoring any length of the body is not suggested.

    With brushing, I wouldn't recommend a curry comb for a long coated dog... at least from my experience they don't do much... short haired dogs, they're great for though!

    I don't know what kind of brush you have, but I'd recommend you get a pin/slicker brush, and a comb. Also perhaps an undercoat rake for shedding season, but not having experience with their coat, I can't say how well that will work for them.

    If you really want to have your dog trimmed, then I'd suggest you just have a sanitary trim (lightly around the bum and short around the groin area, usually a #10 blade) and perhaps if you want you could get his belly, pants (long hair on the back of his back legs) and feathering on his front legs trimmed shorter. This is not how Tibetan Spaniel's are usually groomed though.

    Using clippers is quite easy. But it is good to be shown what to do... bit hard to explain over the internet :/ There are specific areas that you must be careful around and know how to manoeuvre the clippers in order to not catch the dogs skin. Do you know anyone who knows how to clip dogs? If you do they could show you how to safely do it. If you want, I can explain to you where the danger areas are and how to be safe while clipping those areas.

    If you'd rather go to a groomer, I don't know any in Perth, sorry, I'm sure there are some wonderful ones there, but I'm not familiar with any groomers over there. If you just want the basics (sanitary trim and trimming of legs/belly) then make sure you explain that to the groomer really well. Tell them exactly what you want... Short groin, trim around bum lightly, and when you tell them you want his legs/belly trimmed, I'd suggest you give a measurement of how much to take off. 2cm off for example... makes things much easier. And make sure you stress that you do not want any length taken off his body! Some groomers don't listen, but if you find a reputable groomer, you shouldn't have any problems.

    In terms of staying while your dog is groomed, I can appreciate why owners want to do that, and a good groomer will not turn down a new client who wants to stay (or a regular one, if they have a good reason to stay) However 99% of the time, the owner staying for the groom makes things MUCH harder! The dog is constantly distracted!

    I have a wonderful book about grooming all breeds... Its saved me a couple of times when I've forgotten the lines of a particular clip. Here's pictures of the double page on Tibetan Spaniels.


    IMG_1936.jpg IMG_1937.jpg

  4. #4
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    might be you MDD...

    pix and all - woot.

    Yes I know having the owner present can be distracting for the dog and a PITA for the groomer but given some horror stories caused by crappy groomers - it doesn't take long for an owner to work out if their dog is safe and comfortable with a particular groomer - which is a start - even if the haircut seems all wrong afterwards.

    So Auri

    If you can find a groomer who knows what a sanitary clip is - that might help you decide. If there aren't any Tibetan breeders in your area, maybe ask some poodle breeders?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hyacinth View Post
    Yes I know having the owner present can be distracting for the dog and a PITA for the groomer but given some horror stories caused by crappy groomers - it doesn't take long for an owner to work out if their dog is safe and comfortable with a particular groomer - which is a start - even if the haircut seems all wrong afterwards.
    I totally get what you mean! I've heard some pretty nasty horror stories too, both of the dog being hurt as well as awful hair cuts! You do have to be careful where you go. I always offer for my new clients to see out back where I work on the dog's before I take the dog. Pretty much everyone has been quite comfortable about leaving their dog with me, the only times I've had people ask to stay is when their dog has anxiety or health problems.

    Its interesting, in 8 months of grooming at a vet, not a single person has asked to stay, even for ridiculously anxious or sick dogs. I guess they just trust vets more. The only time I've had someone stay at the vet was when I bathed a Guide Dog, and even then, the owner was planning to leave him with me, but he got upset (separation anxiety) so she ended up staying.

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