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Thread: Multivitamin or other supplements necessary?

  1. #1
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    Default Multivitamin or other supplements necessary?

    Murphy is doing very well eating essentially raw meat with maybe a little kibble here and there (he does not appear to be a fan of any brand of kibble; will eat a little every now and then). But I wanted to check in on whether anyone supplements their food with any multivitamins or similar?

    Murphy is an 11 month old Golden Retriever who we have struggled to find a food that he will eat every day.

  2. #2
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    I think there might have been a thread on this.. but i don't remember... if there was, I didn't follow it.

    My opinion is no, if you are giving your dog a healthy balanced diet then he shouldn't need any supplements

  3. #3
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    I would be adding some vege to the raw meat and maybe some sort of calcium source. My dog gets yogurt and there'd be some in the kibble she eats. But she's not that fussy.

    If you have a golden retriever that is fussy about food - I think you may be over feeding. Does he have a waist? Can you feel or see some ribs at the back without pushing?

    This is way too fat - you definitely don't want the keg look


    this is about right. you want a really nice tuck up waist at the back in front of the back legs.

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    Actually now that I think about it, I agree with Hyacinth. If you have a Golden Retriever who is turning down food then perhaps you may be over feeding him... I've never met a golden retriever who turns down food unless they're full.

    People often seem to make the mistake of providing their dogs with too much food and leaving it out for them to eat whenever they want. People also don't seem to realise what 'overweight' actually looks/feels like on a dog.

    I groom loads of Golden Retrievers at work, and I think in the last 6 months I may have seen a total of 2 or 3 that are not overweight, seems to be very common for them to be overweight...

    I know one golden who is only just over a year old, and she is overweight. She didn't used to be overweight, so when I saw her recently it was a big shock to see how much weight she'd gained! She doesn't look anywhere near as bad as the first photo hyacinth put up... but you can't feel her ribs at all, and she sounds unhealthy when she's been exercising :/ Her owners, and most people who look at her don't seem to realise there is a problem...

    Not saying that you are definitely over feeding your boy... just sharing my experiences with the breed
    Last edited by maddogdodge; 01-28-2015 at 11:41 PM.

  5. #5
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    Thanks everyone.

    Murphy has 3 chicken wings in the morning, before we leave for work. Hubby leaves some treats such as a veggie ear, yoghurt drops and kangaroo dental stick. When I get home from work, I give him about 400-500g of either raw gravy beef or chicken breast (we alternate). In the evening, if he is being a little annoying (barking for attention for example) we will give him a bully stick or a chomp and chew to keep him busy.

    It does not sound like a lot of food, but I could be wrong there.

    He is not overweight - vet said that he looks good and there is definitely a waist similar to the pics above), although he is a big boy, very solid and weighs 45kg at the moment.

    We walk him twice a day for about 30 minutes each, which he loves. But he just doesn't seem to like eating kibble.

  6. #6
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    It doesnt sound like a well balanced diet for a young Retriever. Retrievers need to grow out lean as they do carry a higher risk of hip and elbow dysplasias. He sounds like a whopper at 45 kgs, but then I have working sheep dogs and they are lean. I believe in lean dogs.

    I would either investigate the commercial BARF or RAW packs you can buy made up or make your own RAW but do some reading and get some good advice. I occassionally make up a RAW batch and I use human grade mince, heart, a bit of liver, sardines, grated vegies, yoghurt, fish oil, grated apples and eggs. I mix it up and weigh out 250g portions for my dogs. I also feed a good quality kibble to make sure they are getting minerals and vitamins. I also feed raw meaty bones once a week. I think chicken bones are quite high in phosphorus reletive to calcium which can upset the calcium absorption if you feed too many of them.

    I would be doing some reading and seeking advice if you want to make up your own diet.

  7. #7
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    45kg is very heavy for a Golden Retriever... Everything I'm reading says that fully grown male Golden's should be between 29kg and 36kg... Is he taller than your average golden? The standard says 56-61 cms at the shoulder for males.

    My dog gets 450g of dry food a day, but I've recently changed to a better brand to put weight on him, so I'm thinking of lowering it to 300g once he's gained a fair amount of weight, which he is well on the way to doing. He also gets large raw meaty bones once a week. Most people I know with Aussie shepherds only give their dogs 200 -250g of food per day...

    I don't know how much most people with Goldens feed their dogs... I was told to give the one I was looking after, 100g of wet food and 100-150g of dry food per day. Doesn't sound like much and it isn't particularly nutritious dog food... yet somehow she is fat :/

    Lately I've started to question whether I trust vet opinions about dog weights... My dog was too thin in my opinion, so I fed him more, took him to the vet a while later and she still thought he's too thin... but i'm fairly happy with the way he is.... I'd almost say he's bordering chubby now....

    I don't know, but sometimes I wonder if vets are so used to seeing chubby pet dogs that they don't realise what is chubby and what isn't. One thing for sure, I know a lot of people who think their dogs are a great weight, yet I struggle to feel their dog's ribs...

  8. #8
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    Murphy's litter mates are all about the same size (I have spoken with the breeder) [they are of Norwegian bloodlines and are a sturdy lot].

    I will try some of the BARF patties over the weekend and see if he likes those.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by maddogdodge View Post
    45kg is very heavy for a Golden Retriever... Everything I'm reading says that fully grown male Golden's should be between 29kg and 36kg... Is he taller than your average golden? The standard says 56-61 cms at the shoulder for males.

    My dog gets 450g of dry food a day, but I've recently changed to a better brand to put weight on him, so I'm thinking of lowering it to 300g once he's gained a fair amount of weight, which he is well on the way to doing. He also gets large raw meaty bones once a week. Most people I know with Aussie shepherds only give their dogs 200 -250g of food per day...

    I don't know how much most people with Goldens feed their dogs... I was told to give the one I was looking after, 100g of wet food and 100-150g of dry food per day. Doesn't sound like much and it isn't particularly nutritious dog food... yet somehow she is fat :/

    Lately I've started to question whether I trust vet opinions about dog weights... My dog was too thin in my opinion, so I fed him more, took him to the vet a while later and she still thought he's too thin... but i'm fairly happy with the way he is.... I'd almost say he's bordering chubby now....

    I don't know, but sometimes I wonder if vets are so used to seeing chubby pet dogs that they don't realise what is chubby and what isn't. One thing for sure, I know a lot of people who think their dogs are a great weight, yet I struggle to feel their dog's ribs...
    The only vets opinions I trust are ones that treat working dogs regularly. The majority of suburban dogs I see are bordering on chubby. Even my vet friend's dogs are bordering on chubby. One of my bigger dogs stands nearly 57 cm at the shoulder and he is a large boned big Koolie. He weighs in at around 23 kg. He doesnt have an ounce of fat on him and is very well muscled. Dry food wise he gets 2 1/2 cups of good quality daily except twice a week he gets 250g of RAW and a cup of dry.

  10. #10
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    That is far from balanced for a growing dog. There is no calcium, amino acids and vitamins are missing and there's too many filler treats with no nutritional content.

    If you want to feed him raw, fine. No problems. At least add a complete additive like Vets All Natural Health Booster or Sprinter Gold Whelp and Grow to the meat. Chicken wings for a dog of that size are negligible nutritionally - chickens are slaughtered at only a few months old and theres barely any calcium or real nutrition in chicken. I barely eat it myself. Try a lamb neck or ox tail for breakfast instead. Despite being from stockier lines 45kg is a very large golden retriever and he needs proper nutrition for that level of growth. He may be a small eater, some dogs are and can live off next to nothing, but food has to be quality over quantity.
    http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c11/Mali_nut/K9LOGO.jpg

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