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Thread: Quick question on chickenwings

  1. #1
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    Default Quick question on chickenwings

    Yesteday I bought two bags of chickennecks and chickenwings for the dog and have added some to their dinner last night (uncooked of course). Today I found a few splinters of chickenbones next to Rox Bowl. She must have spat them out. They were super spikey - like little needles! Are they really safe to feed?

  2. #2
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    Ah is anything safe to feed?

    I saw an episode of Roger Ram-Vet (Bondi Vet) where a kelpie had inhaled a raw chicken carcass that it was supposed to chew up and eat. Poor dog was slowly choking to death.

    And yet I also hear vets recommending chicken carcass and other bits of raw chicken.

    So are they dangerous - absolutely if the dog chokes on them. And I'm not keen on bone splinters either. But I don't know if you could pierce a dog's stomach with a chicken splinter. Depends how leathery it is I suppose.

    Personally - not something my dog gets. But she did eat a frozen turkey neck with no bad after effect - and that had splinters too. Tho not as long as a big chicken wing might make.

  3. #3
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    Luckily they both don't vacuum their bowls (unless they find a pigear in it) so chocking isn't so much of a worry. They're also not getting the full wings but only the tips. Anyway, they had them for a couple of days now and no problems so far. While they're very sharp, they aren't very hard so I guess they dissolve pretty quickly in the stomach. In any case, they don't seem so keen on the wings anyway, so I'm going to stick to the odd chicken neck in future.

  4. #4
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    We give our dogs chicken wings all the time and never have a problem - they're so cheap and the dogs LOVE them. I put them out for about an hour so the cats can chew on them and clean their teeth (they never eat much) and then let the dogs inside to clean them up

  5. #5
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    The point is the stomach acid is meant to digest it before it gets to the intestines. If your dog is used to digesting raw bone and tissue it will handle it - I feed chicken feet nails and all, whole rabbits, pig heads sliced in half, boiler chickens, cow pelvis etc and my dogs eat it all, and I mean all. But then I feed them raw every day so they can handle it. If your dog is majority processed diet then thats when you hit trouble - the stomach acid level is too low and you get stuck bones, pierced intestines etc. Start with necks every day and move up from there.

    If your dog is a gulper then you give them huge pieces that have to be torn up and chewed. Dogs are not chewers like a herbivore, they tear up and gulp bits they can fit so of course a lovely fresh meal that gets them revved up will be swallowed. Hence why I give big chunky raw pieces, no problems here.
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  6. #6
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    We are the same, we feed RAW, we never have issues. My dogs have enormous bones, be it pelvis, spines (Lamb and cattle) They also do whole chickens which we get from an organic egg farm for $2.00 each and we just half them to each dog.

    The thing I hate the most is the green tripe (smellyeeeeeeeeee!!!!) and a close second is the chicken feet, which my dogs love. I hate the look of the pink little nails on those rubbery feet.

    So I suppose it depends on what your dogs are used to. I think mixing processed and RAW is not as good an idea. there ae so many articles on feeding. We just stick with RAW meat/bone/offal and veg/fruit
    Pets are forever

  7. #7
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    I have just phased out dry food and am now feeding a self cooked mash of veggies, oats, meat and offal. They love it - but I've decided that it's too much work to cook up 10kg of dogfood every Saturday. I actually quite like having a life besides the dogs.

    The reason why I didn't want to feed raw was that I don't want a weeks worth of raw food stinking and rotting away in MY fridge. But I think I've found a solution (2nd freezer) for this problem. So I'm going to transition them to raw over the next few weeks. Chickenwings, necks and giblets in addition to the cooked up mash was the first step. But they are eating bones pretty regularly and Rox eats whole rabbits when she catches them. All of it. So I guess we won't have a problem with a few little chicken wings either.

  8. #8
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    Herre is a direct copy paste that is useful

    Chewing on raw meaty bones for both dogs (and cats) is a time-honoured tradition amongst dog breeders world wide, not to mention the millions of wild dogs that have chewed on bones for up to 40 million years. In more recent times, it has become a topic of much controversy, with some vets now suggesting it may be a dangerous habit to form. It’s important to note that much of this information, or mis-information, relates back to the very nature of the gastric environment of the dog and cat, which in turn, is directly related to diet. Studies performed on dogs eating a dry food diet (in a laboratory setting) will show a significant difference from dogs eating a fresh meat diet, as I will explain below.

    Gastric Acidity is Important

    The gastric acidity (gastric PH) of the stomach of a dog or cat eating a diet predominantly made up of raw meat is very low (very acidic), with a PH of 2 or lower (relative to the level of meat protein). This highly acidic environment favours the breakdown of raw meats, and raw bones, into soft digestible material. The low PH also is highly effective at killing bacteria, particularly potentially pathogenic bacteria like salmonella spp, clostridia, campylobacter and E Coli.

    To maintain low prices, modern processed diets are often high in carbohydrate and plant proteins, with very little meat protein, which directly impacts on the digestive environment of a dog or cat. With decreased acidity levels several key issues arise such as slowed digestion, food bacteria/contaminants not being destroyed effectively, and raw bone material not being softened and broken down (due to decreased digestive enzyme function) which can result in obstruction.

    Dr Bruce’s Feeding Tips

    1. If you intend to make the switch to a balanced fresh meat diet, you must make this change gradually over 7-10 days. A common complaint I hear is from people who feed bones or fresh meat on odd occasions to their dog that eats primarily dry food is that “he/she cant handle fresh meat or bones because she vomits” – as we see from above, these dogs can handle it if it is introduced gradually, and the gastric acidity is allowed to normalise.

    2. If you intend to feed raw bones (which I strongly advise as an important part of everyday pet health) then you must include some fresh meat every day as part of your overall diet plan to make sure the gastric PH remains low (acidic).

    3. Feeding a raw food diet will actually protect your dog or cat from bacterial contamination and food poisoning, and greatly reduce the chance of an obstruction from eating raw bones. It is a fact that dogs that eat processed foods are even more likely to shed salmonella bacteria in their faeces than are dogs that eat raw food!

    from Dr Bruces Vets All Natural - Natural Pet Products, Healthy Pets - Home which I get weekly e-mails from, but i could not find the page
    Pets are forever

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by newfsie View Post
    Herre is a direct copy paste that is useful

    Chewing on raw meaty bones for both dogs (and cats) is a time-honoured tradition amongst dog breeders world wide, not to mention the millions of wild dogs that have chewed on bones for up to 40 million years. In more recent times, it has become a topic of much controversy, with some vets now suggesting it may be a dangerous habit to form. It’s important to note that much of this information, or mis-information, relates back to the very nature of the gastric environment of the dog and cat, which in turn, is directly related to diet. Studies performed on dogs eating a dry food diet (in a laboratory setting) will show a significant difference from dogs eating a fresh meat diet, as I will explain below.

    Gastric Acidity is Important

    The gastric acidity (gastric PH) of the stomach of a dog or cat eating a diet predominantly made up of raw meat is very low (very acidic), with a PH of 2 or lower (relative to the level of meat protein). This highly acidic environment favours the breakdown of raw meats, and raw bones, into soft digestible material. The low PH also is highly effective at killing bacteria, particularly potentially pathogenic bacteria like salmonella spp, clostridia, campylobacter and E Coli.

    To maintain low prices, modern processed diets are often high in carbohydrate and plant proteins, with very little meat protein, which directly impacts on the digestive environment of a dog or cat. With decreased acidity levels several key issues arise such as slowed digestion, food bacteria/contaminants not being destroyed effectively, and raw bone material not being softened and broken down (due to decreased digestive enzyme function) which can result in obstruction.

    Dr Bruce’s Feeding Tips

    1. If you intend to make the switch to a balanced fresh meat diet, you must make this change gradually over 7-10 days. A common complaint I hear is from people who feed bones or fresh meat on odd occasions to their dog that eats primarily dry food is that “he/she cant handle fresh meat or bones because she vomits” – as we see from above, these dogs can handle it if it is introduced gradually, and the gastric acidity is allowed to normalise.

    2. If you intend to feed raw bones (which I strongly advise as an important part of everyday pet health) then you must include some fresh meat every day as part of your overall diet plan to make sure the gastric PH remains low (acidic).

    3. Feeding a raw food diet will actually protect your dog or cat from bacterial contamination and food poisoning, and greatly reduce the chance of an obstruction from eating raw bones. It is a fact that dogs that eat processed foods are even more likely to shed salmonella bacteria in their faeces than are dogs that eat raw food!

    from Dr Bruces Vets All Natural - Natural Pet Products, Healthy Pets - Home which I get weekly e-mails from, but i could not find the page
    Newfsie, you beat me to it! I got that same email today and hurried to copy and paste with this thread in mind!!!

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