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Thread: BARF danger?

  1. #21
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    I would steer clear of hills science diet. And anything the vet tries to sell you - ask them to go through the ingredient list and explain the purpose of each one. You want to look for dry food that starts with a protein ingredient not some cereal (wheat / corn) by product.

    But if you want to make up your own food or buy something that isn't kibble - the options are endless.

    For a puppy - it is safest to get some balanced diet pre-prepared including all the required nutrients for growing dog. Or feed what the breeder feeds. Even if you want to change to something other than what the breeder feeds - do it gradually, part of a meal at a time - not all at once.

    As for bones. I never let my dog have one unsupervised. And rarely even then. Doesn't seem to matter what kind of bone she gets, it usually disagrees with her system in some way. Chicken wing - she kind of mangled it until she could swallow it whole, and then some hours later - brought it up again entirely. Put me off pink frosting icing permanently.

    She also can bust up marrow bones (what wimps are Sean's dogs), and then eat the splinters. These are fresh bones. Whole egg, shell and all are better sources of calcium. At least those are less likely to cause splinter spiking on the way through. Ie bones get her coming and going and it looks painful to me.

    I've seen another dog in the bondi vet for inhaling a raw chicken carcass.

    And a friend spent $6000 at the vet when her dog inhaled a beef neck bone.

    Mum spent a lot of money at the vet when it turned out the chicken mince she'd been cooking into dog dinner was actually minced chicken carcass and not meant to be cooked.

    I just figure it's not worth the grief and mess and expense.

    If you do want to give your dog a bone - make sure you supervise and they chew it up properly. Chicken necks seem the least risky. I look to get the calcium elsewhere like yogurt or kibble. Kibble often includes ground bones or carcass called "meat meal".

  2. #22
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    I find the raw mince and VAN mix barely any trouble at all to prepare. I would probably find it more of a hassle to have to peel the packaging of that roll (they're always so hard to open!), cutting it in pieces and then wrapping it with glad wrap to put in the fridge again. I pre-mix the VAN and keep it in a container in the fridge. I buy about 10 one kilo packs of mince, freeze them and then put 2 in a container in the fridge for immediate use. Then at dinner time it's just a scoop of the mix and a few scoops of the mince, mix and serve.

    Hya, I recently had a vet recommend whole rabbit to feed to my cat over their prescription diet. I nearly fell off my chair.

    I don't share your anxiety over feeding raw bones though. I'm sure bone incidents do happen, but I don't think they are common enough to justify not giving my dog bones. My favourite bones are knee joints. They don't seem to splinter at all. The dogs do manage to gnaw them down to a fairly small size eventually but by then they are nowhere near attractive enough anymore for them to attempt to swallow them and then I remove them because they have already been replaced with fresh ones.

  3. #23
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    I'm sure bone incidents do happen, but I don't think they are common enough to justify not giving my dog bones.
    I think this depends on the dog. Happens almost every time with my dog.

    And I got sick of having to let her out in a hurry at 3am because some spikey bit of bone wasn't going through right and had to be expelled IMMEDIATELY.

    She does take a while to get anywhere with the big ball joints. The trick would be cutting off all the shaft bone.

  4. #24
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    Vets All Natural does not make a kibble, you soak a vege/natural mix in water then mix it with the meat of your choice. I make up a few days worth at a time in a storage container in the bottom of the fridge and dish it out (I make 10kg at a time as I have 5 dogs) If you try soaking, mixing etc every day it can seem tedious but there's nothing wrong with making it only once or twice a week with good quality mince. It has all the calcium your pup needs in it so you don't have to worry. There is a pre prepared dog roll which is 'set' in a water bath, not cooked to death. I use it as emergency food especially for the ferrets as we have them on the Vets All Natural too but just mince + health booster powder as they cannot digest any sort of vegetable protein at all, it just runs straight through them. Dr Syme reccomends kangaroo or rabbit as they are not farmed, ie no residual chemicals but my dogs dont do well on roo at all so I use beef. I find chicken way too white and lean for my dogs but then again I have high energy dogs that need that extra pep.

    If you feed bones you need to feed size appropriate. Chicken necks and wings are really only good for tiny puppies, most others should be moved onto chicken frames at 8 weeks old so they have to sit there and gnaw. That or lamb flaps/necks. I used to feed my dogs whole boiler chickens or pig heads even as young dogs, now I stick to lamb spine/neck and flaps.

    Any weight bearing bones in an animal should be considered inedible. The structure of the bone itself is different since it has to take weight and impact. It's denser and breaks into shards, so things like chicken drumsticks, lamb shanks, marrow bones are the most dangerous so if you give them to your dog they need to be a lot bigger then the dogs head in order to be safely used as a chew item. The biggest reason I dont bother with them is they're so dense they grind down the teeth over the years a lot faster.

  5. #25
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    The big ball joint is the best part.
    My two are currently gnawing on them and it sounds like hard work,
    they are always tired and sleep like logs afterward.

    I tried chicken necks and both Chubb and Snoopy tried to swallow them whole
    and nearly choked.

    I really does depend on the individual dog.
    A good (nice) butcher will cut the ball joint across and just sell you the joint with no shaft.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by chubbsecurity View Post
    The big ball joint is the best part.
    My two are currently gnawing on them and it sounds like hard work,
    they are always tired and sleep like logs afterward.

    I tried chicken necks and both Chubb and Snoopy tried to swallow them whole
    and nearly choked.

    I really does depend on the individual dog.
    A good (nice) butcher will cut the ball joint across and just sell you the joint with no shaft.
    Yep, I recently found a butcher who does that. The bones last a long time too and both Banjo and the pup love them and they don't shatter. (So much that they try to smuggle them into the house at every opportunity!)

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