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Thread: A Question for Clubsprint

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by clubsprint View Post
    Hyacynth
    These stats were originally quoted in support of pits now you're discrediting them?? Re the top ten biters. Amstaffs are Pitbulls. To say otherwise is fallacy. It's like saying the is a difference between Alsatians and German Shepards or Heelers and Australian Cattle Dogs. Misidentification has long been the ally of the pro/pitbull fraternity.
    I'm sorry, but AmStaffy's aren't Pit Bulls buddy.

    The first comment that must be made is that the American Staffordshire Terrier is NOT an American Pit Bull Terrier. Although their origins are the same - the two are entirely separate breeds, and they must not be confused with each other.

    The Pit Bull is not recognised as a pure bred dog by the ANKC (Australian National Kennel Club) and is banned from further importation into Australia. The Breed is also not recognised by the main controlling body for purebred dogs in the United States the AKC (American Kennel Club). The UKC (United Kennel Club) in the United States does however recognise Pitbulls. The UKC is not affiliated with ANKC or the AKC.

    The American Staffordshire Terrier or Am Staff as it is commonly known, was officially recognised in 1936 by the American Kennel Club.

    The first Amstaff arrived in Australia in 1986 with the breeds popularity slowly increased. Some believe that the bred in a large version of the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. If you have owned both breed you would come to realise that this is far from correct. The Am Staff does have its similarities to the Stafford but they are definitely not a larger version of the Stafford.
    Sourced from Evastaff Kennels - The American Staffordshire Terrier

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  2. #122

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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    I'm sorry, but AmStaffy's aren't Pit Bulls buddy.



    Sourced from Evastaff Kennels - The American Staffordshire Terrier
    That information is biased.
    I know plenty of people who have registered their APBT's as AMstaffs.
    Same shit different bucket.

  3. #123
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    So do I Puggerup. But they are not the same breed, they may be similar in appearance, but have different traits etc.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  4. #124

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    The traits and appearance are virtually, if not, the same.. the only difference is the kennel they are bred from and what they are registered as.

  5. #125
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    Hhm I think we will have to agree to disagree on this one

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  6. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beloz View Post
    Nice analysis, ricey. I would also guess that Calgary might have a slightly higher percentage of APBTs than other cities, because of the lack of BSL. But that is a mere assumption. Popularity of the breed does matter too though.
    Yes, I'd assume that Calgary has had an upsurge in pit bull ownership, but I haven't been able to source the official statistics from the City of Calgary. I will keep looking for these stats, and when I find them, I will post them.

    ricey

  7. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    My next pup will be a Cav! Lol hopefully not for a few good years yet though
    Hmmm, are you sure you want one of these? Sure, they are cute and lovable little dogs, but they do have their problems.

    This is a breed that almost always has syringomyelia, and usually dies of heart failure due to mitral valve insufficiency. Only 1 in 8 cavaliers lives long enough to die of old age.

    Before buying a Cavalier King Charles spaniel (or any other dog breed for that matter), I'd recommend doing some research. For example, my own favourite breed (American Pit Bull terrier) has higher than usual rates of hip dysplasia, and the dilute colours have higher than usual rates of skin allergies.

    The Cavalier is acknowledged by its breeders to have very high rates of syringomyelia; this is a horrid and painful condition for the dog.

    Cavalier King Charles Spaniel - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Cavalier King Charles Spaniel - Health & Genetic Diseases

    Home

    Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club - USA - Syringomyelia Information

    I am not trying to start a flame war here about the health problems of particular pure bred dog breeds; all breeds have their problems.

    ricey

  8. #128

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    ricey, my dog has no health issues. If you get one from a reputable breeder, then the chances of having a dog with health issues lower.

  9. #129

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    also, we are in Australia not the USA or UK. I literally know 100's of people in Aus with Cavaliers and only ONE has Syringomyelia.

  10. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by puggerup View Post
    also, we are in Australia not the USA or UK. I literally know 100's of people in Aus with Cavaliers and only ONE has Syringomyelia.
    Ah, that's good to know. I thought long and hard about submitting that post of mine (I totally re-wrote it about 5 times as I really didn't want to cause offence to anyone). I had heard so many horror stories about Cavs over the years that I just assumed it meant that Australian Cavs would be the same.

    I'm glad to hear that Australian Cavaliers are not generally affected by syringomyelia. Usually, having a relatively small gene pool (as you get in Australia) is not a good thing, but if the small gene pool does not include the genes for this disease, then it is a good thing (I hope that made sense).

    Cheers,

    ricey

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