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Thread: Cat Attack

  1. #41
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    Jan 2009
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    Moggill, Queensland
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    Most councils in Queensland have the same restrictions as the Ipswich council, which says they have to be contained on your property at all times.

  2. #42
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    May 2009
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    As an illustration of something that Hyacinth and I were talking about in another thread, discussion and debate are great learning tools.

    I have just discovered that Moreton Bay also has the same law, as well as a couple of other QLD Councils.

    Does anyone know if this is across all of QLD as a state thing, or is it LGA governed? It doesn't seem to come under the Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008.
    A pessimist sees the glass as half empty;
    An optimist sees the glass as half full;
    A realist just finishes the damn thing and refills it.

  3. #43

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    I'm fairly certain that most councils in QLD with suburban residential areas have this law.

  4. #44
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    Apr 2011
    Location
    Darwin
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    If you're not sure who the owners are maybe you can take the cat to a local shelter/vet & they can see if it was microchipped.

    I'd leave the part about your dogs out of what you tell the owners if you find them. Its not going to help the owners, you may lose your dogs & you don't 100% know what happened - the cat may have been hiding in the bushes because it was already injured or sick.

  5. #45

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    Honesty is the best policy.... always Don't keep quiet about it. You may have been seen and if someone else has reported it to council it will go better for you if you have tried to do the right thing. I would want to know what happened if it were my cat. Please do get muzzles for your dogs, again when council gets involved you will be seen to be doing the right thing. I wonder if the cat may have been under the bush already injured as it did not run away from the dogs immediately? hope this helps Alysoun

  6. #46

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    May I ask what breed are your dogs?

  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by clubsprint View Post
    May I ask what breed are your dogs?
    What are you hoping they are Pitbulls so you can degrade the breed .....

    BTW the OP has been long gone for a while now, check the dates on the previous posts May was the last one and even that one was old.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    What are you hoping they are Pitbulls so you can degrade the breed .....
    I think the word you're after is denigrate and I need do very little to denigrate the breed, they will do a good enough job of that without my help. The dogs probably should have been muzzled because of their previous history.

    Quote Originally Posted by Keira & Phoenix View Post
    BTW the OP has been long gone for a while now, check the dates on the previous posts May was the last one and even that one was old.
    You're right I should have looked at the dates.

    As for APBs. I tried to stop them 30 years ago from being imported and everything I said at the time or wrote has come true. I don't think that the ban's go far enough. I hate to say "I told you so." I wish I could remember the name of the minister as I'd like him to explain to Ayen Chol's parents why he did nothing.

  9. #49
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    Jan 2009
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    I think you should take your pit bull hate elsewhere, because we just don't need it here.

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by clubsprint View Post
    I think the word you're after is denigrate and I need do very little to denigrate the breed, they will do a good enough job of that without my help. The dogs probably should have been muzzled because of their previous history.

    You're right I should have looked at the dates.

    As for APBs. I tried to stop them 30 years ago from being imported and everything I said at the time or wrote has come true. I don't think that the ban's go far enough. I hate to say "I told you so." I wish I could remember the name of the minister as I'd like him to explain to Ayen Chol's parents why he did nothing.
    Nope I meant degrade - Don't try and correct me. (Degrade = To lower in dignity; dishonor or disgrace)

    Your just plain naive if you think APBT are the only breed of dog that bites. doG almighty. Find me ONE fatality caused by a PUREBRED APBT in Australia, please. Oh wait you wont because a purebred APBT have never been involved in a fatality in Australia. The problem dogs are the crossbreeds bred out of dogs with faulty temperaments with a complete and utter lack of breeding for solid temps who end up in the hands of idiot owners who don't know anything about dog training or behaviour or don't care.

    You are just another naive person who knows very little about the true nature of the ACTUALLY BREED (That is the APBT not "Pitbulls"). BREED BANS DON'T WORK. It has been proven over and over again all over the world.
    People are the problem, stop blaming dogs. Seriously we think we are so intelligent and superior yet we continue to blame a breed of dogs instead of ourselves.

    If you need proof Calgary in Canada moved away from BSL and started legislating towards ownership, their bite rates are the lowest they have ever been in 25 years. No other Country, State, Province, County or Council area with BSL in the world can claim what Calgary can claim. In Calgary they bring in APBT's from other BSL affected cities and foster or rehome them, the number of APBT's and their crosses in Calgary is getting higher and higher and yet their bite rates are still getting lower, so please explain to me how that works if APBT's are the problem??

    Here is a great website about their bylaws - their working bylaws!
    The Calgary Model

    So maybe 30 years ago instead of trying to ban our breed from being bought into the country you should have been lobbying for tougher laws on ownership, maybe then we wouldn't have the bite stats that we do now.


    Calgary dog attacks fall to lowest level in 25 years
    City a leader in reducing canine problems, says top bylaw officer

    By Sean Myers, Calgary HeraldFebruary 21, 2009


    Attacks by aggressive dogs are at the lowest level they've been in 25 years despite a steady population growth and the absence of breed-specific legislation brought in to tackle canine issues in other jurisdictions.

    Despite the low numbers, Calgary's top bylaw officer plans to delve deeper into the causes of dog attacks to try to bring the incidents even lower.

    "This is exactly what we've been targeting," said Bill Bruce. "Our ultimate goal, of course, is to get it to zero, or as close to that as possible."

    Bruce said Calgary is a leader in reducing dog attacks in Canada, noting that he often receives invitations from animal services around the world to talk about the work done here to reduce dog bites.

    Calgary bylaw officers recorded 340 reported aggressive dog incidents in 2008 which included chases, bites and damage to property.

    Of those, 145 complaints were bites.

    In 2007, 374 aggressive dog calls were made, including 137 bites, and in 2006, of 402 aggressive dog complaints, 199 were for bites.

    By comparison, back in 1985, the city received a whopping 1,938 aggressive dog complaints, including 621 bites, at a time when Calgary had a population of just over 600,000.

    A new pet owner bylaw was brought in three years ago that included stiffer fines and a recognition that aggressive behaviour in dogs is normally traced back to irresponsible owners. Bruce said both the heavier penalties -- ranging from $350 to $1,500, to euthanizing the dog--and the philosophy of blaming bad owners rather than pets has helped reduce incidents.

    This year, Bruce is launching a pilot project where he'll have six officers dedicated to following up every aggressive dog complaint to identify common factors in attacks that can be addressed in future bylaw enforcement and public education campaigns.

    "We want to look at everything that led up to an aggressive dog attack," said Bruce. "We're hoping to find four to six common things that people do that causes dogs to bite. Our goal is not to have anyone bitten by a dog."

    At the same time Bruce investigates softer approaches to addressing pet owner issues, he's also been given a bigger stick with which to penalize chronically non-compliant dog owners.

    In the fall, bylaw enforcement gained the right to tag a dog as a nuisance pet, which means doubling the fines on the owner.

    One dog has already received this designation, according to Bruce.

    Brandy Campbell-Biggs, president of Pit Bulls For Life, a non-profit animal rescue operation geared specifically toward pit bulls, said targeting bad owners instead of stigmatizing entire breeds is the key to reducing aggressive incidents.

    While dog bites have been going down, the number of pit bulls coming to the city has been increasing, she said.

    She doesn't know how many there are in the city, but her organization has placed 160 pit bulls in foster homes or with permanent adoptive owners in Calgary over the past three and a half years.

    Pit Bulls For Life brings the dogs in from jurisdictions with breed-specific legislation that sees many breeds deemed dangers, including pit bulls, targeted for euthanasia. She said 20 per cent of the dogs they help come from Ontario.

    "We have a lot more pit bulls in Calgary now," said Campbell-Briggs. "Part of the reason is we don't have breed-specific legislation. I'm proud to be a Calgarian because our animal by-law officers deal with specific incidents and don't deal with it as a breed issue. There's no bias and that's so important."

    Pit Bulls For Life doesn't take in any dogs with histories of aggression toward humans or other animals and says it works with the city bylaw department to educate owners.

    Canada Post has also noticed a slight reduction in dog incidents involving its letter carriers in Calgary that bucks the trend nationally.

    From January to August last year, 25 dog incidents were reported by carriers, two of which resulted in time off work. In the same time period in 2007, 28 incidents were reported, with three requiring time away from work.

    An aggressive dog can lead to an entire block losing mail service until the animal is brought under control.

    "We have to ensure the safety of our employees--your front step and front yard are our employees'workplace,"said Andrean Wolvers, Canada Post safety manager for Calgary. "We tell our employees when in doubt, get out."

    Wolvers says partnerships with the city and other organizations that send employees into residential neighbourhoods has helped reduce dog attacks on posties.

    "The city and Bill Bruce have been very proactive," said Wolvers.

    The Calgary Humane Society said the working relationship it has with the city is unique in Canada.

    "We have a very collaborative relation-ship. When we talk to other humane societies, they say we're the only ones they've heard of that have a positive working relationship with the city bylaw department," said Calgary Humane Society spokeswoman Lindsay Jones.

    "Other cities learn from us and the way we do things here."

    smyers@theherald.canwest.com
    Last edited by Keira & Phoenix; 09-08-2011 at 07:53 AM.

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