Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33

Thread: Fatal Dog Attacks what they have in common - USA vet Study via Victoria Stillwell

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default Fatal Dog Attacks what they have in common - USA vet Study via Victoria Stillwell

    Fatal Dog Bites Share Common Factors

    The Journal of the American Veterinary Association has published an article on fatal dog bites. This also shows how far media reports can be from the truth.

    Potentially Preventable Husbandry Factors Co-occur in Most Dog Bite-Related Fatalities | National Canine Research Council

    AMVA journals abstract

    journal table of contents with short version

    There are 5 preventable reasons that most fatal dog attacks have in common - and breed is not one of them.

    #1 - There is nobody strong and able enough to prevent/stop the attack. 87%

    #2 - The victim is a stranger to the dog. 85% (but the attack can be at the dog's home)

    #3 - the dog is not desexed - 84%

    You often get people saying that desexing made no difference to their dog but when it comes to serious injuries from dog attacks - seems the desexed dogs are in the minority - less than 15%.

    #4 - the victim can't / doesn't behave appropriately around dogs - this applies to small children, and mentally or physcially disabled people. If you can't train your children (or handicapped friend) how to behave - especially with dogs they don't know - then protect them.

    #5 - The dog is a backyard garden ornament - and deprived of human contact. 76% - so it's the family pet but not part of the pack.

    lastly but significantly...
    #6 - The owner has mismanaged the dog in the past (37.5%)
    (is this training it to attack or failing to train bite inhibitiion)
    or has abused or neglected the dog (21.1%)
    (a starving dog will eat what it can catch).

    As far as breed goes - only 18% of breeds could be identified (not what you'd get from the media) and of those - there were 20 different breeds (not all pitbulls or whatever breed is media flavour of the year).

    So BSL will not do anything to prevent dog attacks - something the Italians can already tell you. They banned 95 different breeds of dogs - and yet there were still dog attacks. It's down to the owners about 85% of the time.
    Last edited by Hyacinth; 12-07-2013 at 01:48 PM. Reason: rewrite broken post - always write long posts in notepad first

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Mid North Coast NSW
    Posts
    388

    Default

    Most of that's not very surprising really, is it, for those of us who have half an idea.

    Thanks Hyacinth, interesting reading. Hopefully this study will be seen and taken seriously by the Australian powers-that-be.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    se qld
    Posts
    836

    Default

    #The dog being not desexed.
    We avoid dogs with big balls as they make Snoopy anxious.

    I also saw somewhere that 80+% of ALL dogs hit by cars are entire males.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

    Default

    Fatal Dog Attacks what they have in common....I thing it's Irresponsible owners most of the time.

    If the dog was under control and supervised and not roaming the streets...raised correctly and treated as part of the family...we wouldn't have this happening at all.

    I think this sums it up perfectly... #5 - The dog is a backyard garden ornament - and deprived of human contact. 76%
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    Fatal Dog Attacks what they have in common....I thing it's Irresponsible owners most of the time.

    If the dog was under control and supervised and not roaming the streets...raised correctly and treated as part of the family...we wouldn't have this happening at all.

    I think this sums it up perfectly... #5 - The dog is a backyard garden ornament - and deprived of human contact. 76%
    Yup, although I think 76% is probably too low for that scenario. A dog that is locked in a backyard with little human contact/mental stimulation is significantly more likely to go nuts if given the chance. I think the laws should really crack down on those sort of owners, not only are they creating a potential threat to society but they're effectively torturing their dog

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    we all know who those people are with the dog garden ornament - but how do we prove it - is the hard thing.

    RSPCA is trying to introduce some rules about dog quality of life but it's not easy. Even I don't take my dog for a walk every single day. We're both a bit averse to pouring rain.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    It would be hard to prove indeed. I think it is more a cultural change that's needed than anything else too. In other countries, leaving a dog outside 24/7 is just unheard of. Even if they do have a suitable backyard. The standard is for the dog to live inside with the family. That's definitely the case in Belgium where I come from. There used to be a problem with farm dogs being tied to their kennel when I was a kid, but they seriously cracked down on that back then.

    Here there are still so many people who think dogs belong outside only and think you spoil your dog by letting them inside. If we can slowly break down that kind of thinking, maybe there would at least be some improvement. And again, mandatory classes for new dog owners would be a good vehicle for those kind of messages.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    I've got several farmer cousins who leave their dogs when not working - chained up outside. I suggested one time that dog runs would be better and they thought that was more cruel than chains around the neck. Bleah.

    With one cousin, the dogs do get off twice a day for a 20 to 30 minute run - plus any working time and the retired ones get to be in house pets. But several of my other cousins regard dogs inside with horror. I guess they're thinking about fun things like fleas and tape worm. As a kid I got told to stay away from the farm dogs because of these things, and to wash my hands very very thoroughly if I did pat one.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Western Sydney
    Posts
    809

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mymatejack View Post
    Yup, although I think 76% is probably too low for that scenario. A dog that is locked in a backyard with little human contact/mental stimulation is significantly more likely to go nuts if given the chance. I think the laws should really crack down on those sort of owners, not only are they creating a potential threat to society but they're effectively torturing their dog
    Yes totally agree with you...most likely closer to 99% of the problem. My Chloe was one of those poor dogs...she had never been in a house before we got her...walked on a lead...been in a car or around other dogs and then dumped in the pound at 6 mths of age because she was too hard to handle though lack of training.

    Chloe didn't know what a tennis ball was or seen a kong or chew rope either...which is very sad and makes my blood boil...how anyone could be so bloody cruel. Chloe was lucky she wasn't surrendered to the R$PCA...because they would have killed her...as she would have failed their stupid temperament tests.
    We all know the tests...chase a Ball...kill...Playbite...kill...Jump up on people...kill...certain breeds...kill and the Doll test.. Where they shove a doll in front of a terrified dog and if the dog barks or growls at the doll...kill. Wife has a sleeping beauty Doll one meter high with long black hair...Chloe has never seen it...so I took it out of the box (without wife knowing) and called Chloe..as soon as she saw it...she jumped back and barked and growled at it...all the hair on her back stood up too...had she done this at the R$PCA she would be dead...as these idiots claim that the doll represents a child.
    Chloe & Zorro
    Rottweilers and German Shepherds are Family

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rural Western Australia
    Posts
    2,635

    Default

    The other part of the equation is that you understand the breed charateristics and tendencies of your chosen breed. Pits were bred as fighting dogs and to be dog aggressive and not human aggressive. Most responsible owners of pits I have know are always vigilant with their dogs around other dogs regardless of how good they appear. Herding dogs can have that tendency to chase and nip. Lethal around cars and a potential problem with fast moving kids. Sight hounds no matter how well trained can have a debateable recall around small furry animals. So along with everything else people need to understand their breed.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •