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Thread: Fatal Dog Attacks what they have in common - USA vet Study via Victoria Stillwell

  1. #21

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    Being a Stafford fan(all the different types including the APBT) I absolutely agree that instinct is built in. It can be trained to be controlled but the instinct is always there(with dogs that actually have that instinct - not all Staffords do these days). Why do Staffords always bee line for the nearest other Stafford over any other breed? Because they know that the dog will most likely love to play fight at their kinda rough level. Training, socialisation, responsible ownership, knowing what to do if something goes wrong etc etc etc is what's important.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogman View Post
    The videos I posted show that Pitbulls are not like some people claim them to be....I've heard many bad things said about GSDs...Rotties and Dobermanns that just defies belief. A GSD is a sheep dog...does my GSD know how to heard sheep...no. A Rottie was a cattle dog and latter pulled carts...do Rotties know to do these things...no. The Dobermann was bred to be a vicious guard dog...are Dobes vicious guard dogs...no. A few years ago a shopkeeper put a Dobermann in the backyard of the shop...someone broke in and stole the Dobermann...so what does this all mean...dogs aren't born trained...it's up to the owner and in some cases that's the problem.
    Like the vast majority of pitbulls, the vast majority of GSD's or whatever can be brought up to be lovely sociable friendly dogs - there will always be the occasional dog from any breed that is just wired wrong. It mostly comes down to nurture but nature still plays her part, like the others have said regarding herding dogs, try and teach my Stafford to herd some sheep ... it would be quite funny, although it would probably end up requiring human intervention when the sheep he picked on didn't quite understand doggy play fighting LOL

  3. #23
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    Many years ago my dad told me of a publican at his local pub when he was young who had a very large APBT. This dog was wonderful with humans and was a fixture at the pub. Loved socialising with the regulars and stranger alike. Loved people with a passion and people like him. However it would kill any other canine it came into contact with, was like this from a puppy. Everyone knew this and the dog was managed accordingly. The dog was well trained and socialised and there was nothing wrong with its wiring and it wasnt trainined to kill other dogs or used for fighting, it just did not like other dogs. It lived out its life at the pub with no problems at all. Back in those days it was likely it was working bred from fighting lines.

    Dad said it was such an extreme sook with people that it would love to have its broad chest rubbed by all and sundry and would vocalise grunts of pleasure
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 12-12-2013 at 10:31 AM.

  4. #24

  5. #25
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    That's the same journal article but with more of the content revealed.

    there is about 1 death by dog for every 2.5 million dogs in the country. When compared to people being murdered by other humans, we have 1000 times more chances to be killed by one of our own rather than by our canine friend!
    50% of all children are bit before the age of 12!... (snip)
    Those who are the most at risk are children between 5-9 years old and male adults.
    ... children are more likely to get bitten if they do this:
    When children see themselves as having authority over the dog, they are more likely to try to ‘dominate’ the dog, to be the ‘alpha’. In other words, instead of developing a relationship based on mutual respect and understanding, they tend to forcefully impose their will on the animal.
    The suggested reason for this - is that trying to dominate - causes the dog stress and fear and they're more likely to react (bite).

  6. #26
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    I think children are also fast moving and can excite a dogs instincts. I was at a party when I was about 10 and there was an adolescent GSD in the mix. This dog was large and high drive. He hadnt shown any prior aggression towards the kids that knew him well and we had played with him om many occassion and he was well socialised with us.

    Anyway we were all running around and laughing possibly chasing a soccer ball the details escape me but picture a group of excited 10 year olds, and the dog was in the mix very excited. Then suddenly in the excitement of it all he attacked one boy and sank his teeth into the boys back and shoulder and brought him down. The bite was bad enough for the ambulance to be called. This boy was among the some of the kids that didnt know the dog well and he was also a bit bigger than some of us.

    The police came the next day and took the dog away to be tested in their training program. This was in South Africa many years ago and they used dogs a lot in the police and military.

    Being a child I cannot assess what really happened but I had known this dog from a puppy as he lived next door and he used to come everywhere with us.
    Last edited by Kalacreek; 12-14-2013 at 11:20 AM.

  7. #27
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    I, regretfully will not have my dogs inside or in the back yard this Christmas.
    They will be confined to their pen for 24hrs or so. This is no great hardship..95m circumference, big shady trees, all sand to dig in, clam shell pools, garden shed with their beds..exactly designed for this type of rare occasion.
    I will have people staying here who have young kids. My dogs are not used to multiple people here and certainly not used to young children. I am quite sure that 3 out of the 4 would be fine with them, the 4th would be iffy and need my eye on her at all times (as would they all really,) something I know would be impossible, so for peace of mind and safety they will be confined. The kids can pat the ones who want patting through the wire.

    I could mix it up for variety, have the dogs with us and the kids in the pen (this was their mother's suggestion, lol. She recons with the trees to climb, the pools, the sand (we live on a sand hill) the kids would LOVE the pen but I will keep it to my plan.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

  8. #28
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    Yes if I take my dog where kids will be this Christmas the crate (or maybe two crates) will be going with us. Just so she has somewhere safe to be when I can't be supervising.

    one crate for dog, one crate for kids to play cubbys - tho this might be bad for the crate and a fold up table and blanky might be better... The big crate, me and my dog will fit comfortably in...

  9. #29

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    Maybe - as owners of pups we need to be more aware of exactly how our emotions affect our pups !

    Dogs Read Your Emotions and Attach Them to What You Look At | Psychology Today

    So the stereotypes of owners attached to certain breeds/cross breeds of dogs may actually be true ?

  10. #30
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    Yeah? Wonder why mine couldn't stand a friend of ours for a few years when we always welcomed him warmly. They adore him now though.
    I don't think everything is that black or white though.

    Any posts made under the name of Di_dee1 one can be used by anyone as I do not give a rats.

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