Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Seeking data on impact of lower license fee for neutered dogs

  1. #1

    Default Seeking data on impact of lower license fee for neutered dogs

    Hi all. I am looking for reports on the impact that charging a lower license fee for neutered dogs and a higher fee for intact dogs has had in Australia. We do not have such a system here in Ireland and I am trying to work out if there has been a positive impact since this system has been introduced in Australia. A comparison of the number of dogs destroyed per year before and after the system was introduced would be very useful.

    Does anyone have any tips on where I could get my hands on such reports?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    Dog registration is administered by local councils here. I live in Canberra and we have life long registration. You do need a licence to keep an entire dog over a certain age. Unfortunately no one enforces this and you are not asked to provide any proof of neutering when you register your dog either.

    So it's not an Australia wide system and you may be best focusing on a particular municipality for your research.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    I live in Melbourne, (like a county) there are several councils in such a large area of land.
    the one i live in is sunbury, (like a village) in Hume City Council (like the nearest town)
    Im english, and trying to translate for you, dont be fooled that aussies, are said to speak english, they dont. As you can see from translations)

    here's details to contact details for aniimal registry for Hume, from there, they should be able to guide you to national records.

    1079 Pascoe Vale Road Broadmeadows Victoria 3047 PO Box 119 Dallas Victoria 3047 Phone: 03 9205 2200 Email: contactus@hume.vic.gov.au

    I have 2 male dogs, 1 desexed, 1 entire. The fee is different, its cheaper to register a desexed dog.
    It used to be cheaper to register if your dog was microchipped, but that changed, and no difference in price now.

    I can tell you, as a large breed owner, that it is the norm, to allow the dog to grow entire, till 18 months/2yrs till bone plates have set. Then free to desex past this date, providing you are not breeding/showing.
    To me personally, coming from uk, where male dogs are not routinely desexed, its a weird ass law based on anecdotal evidence, where dogs have killed that were entire, and knee jerk reactive legislation, same as every other country. But as dogs that kill, are forced to PTS, why bother desexing a totally different dog? go figure?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    near Sydney NSW
    Posts
    727

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Flibble View Post
    A comparison of the number of dogs destroyed per year before and after the system was introduced would be very useful.
    It's possible that the advent of puppy farms selling pups over the internet might skew the relevance of comparing these kill rates.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    3,082

    Default

    The difference in cost for entire/neutered dog is a straight $50 or Twenty Eight Pounds Fifty pence lol

    Hardly gonna break the bank is it, yet i find folks believe the hype here, that it costs LOTS to keep a dog entire. That dogs should be castrated or they become aggressive. Says who? My Vet for one. and a discussion he ends, when i remind him of my entire males, who have not been aggressive, wander off, destructive or any of the other pearls of crap he offers re dog behaviour. I wish he'd stick to medicine, and leave the psychology out of his consults, as he's not qualified to offer an opinion really, but does each time i visit with a pup.
    Aussie folks arrive at male dog ownership, with the false handed down notion of desexing males is a necessary thing. It is not, not legally, nor behaviourally.

    What i do think is a HUGE variable, is the cultural differences between uk and Aussie dog ownership.
    In Australia, it is common to have dogs, yet they do not get to enter the house. In the uk, despite living in terraced housing 2up to down, dogs were indoors with family.
    Being an indoors dog, they must be trained or they wreak havoc. Whereas you can have a feral monster in your yard, never gets walked/trained/socialized, and when it does get out?

    I would be interested to read some decent random controlled trial lit on this issue, if anyone finds some.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    224

    Default

    Interesting discussion, in SA the local councils also give lower rego fees for neutered dogs but like Bernie says is not likely to be the reason you do it. I don't think an entire dog is necessarily going to become aggressive but with the extra hormones there could be a potential for more behavioural problems. I've watched dog shows where professional trainers say that if you are not going to breed your dog then why make it go through all the hormonal urges that you are never going to let it satisfy? Which I think is a valid point.

    Mostly though I think it comes down to the councils trying to minimise the amount of unwanted puppies and that comes down to whether or not you are a responsible owner.

    Personally i'm going to get my dog neutered not just so it doesn't go through as many hormonal swings but also so it doesn't attract other dogs from the neighbourhood.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    I was a bit confused about the link between unneutered dogs and the number of destroyed dogs, but I think the OP is referring to the reduction in unwanted pups that end up at the pound.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    Hi Mr Fibble

    Data is rarely released on kill rates because it causes very emotional over-reactions.

    You could try writing to our various rescues and pounds eg RSPCA, AWL, Lost Dogs Homes and various council pounds...

    Some of them have contact details listed here
    PetRescue - Inspired by unconditional love - PetRescue

    Pet Rescue is supposed to only list rescues that get their puppies and dogs desexed before rehoming. And for a while now - many dogs get ear tattoos to indicate desexing and microchipping which might help the data.

    Puppy farms and back yard breeders who sell to pet shops and off the classified ad systems do not get their puppies microchipped (depending on state law) or desexed before selling them so they're still contributing to the problem. And in my opinion people who buy on impulse - are more likely to get their dog from a pet shop or off the classified... and they're more likely to dump. But I don't have any data for that. Not sure if the RSPCA and the like would either. People lie when they abandon their dogs there.

  9. #9

    Default

    I think there's a perhaps a correlation without there being a conclusive relationship - what I mean is that we know that people can have entire dogs that don't attack people or other dogs (I own one myself). It would also stand to reason that if people do not train or invest in their dogs in any way, they are also less likely to pay to have the animal desexed. So as far as I can see, it would make sense that more of the dogs involved in attacks are entire because almost all the dogs belonging to people who do not train or look after their animals properly would leave them entire (as it's the default status - less work and money on their part).

    Where I live at the moment, it would cost almost $70 more per year to register my dog than if he were desexed. That's money I think I could better spend on things I know will reduce his likelihood of causing issues - training and the like, so I do not think this is fair at all. He holds a CD title and a BH and has never roamed, caused issue, attacked anyone or anything and I have spent $1000's on training this dog, not to mention the hours that have gone in. A fairer system in my eyes would be one that recognises fact rather than correlations, and acknowledged that training has a much greater impact on how dangerous the dog will be in society than whether it's entire or not.

    I will never desex my dog because I have read very disturbing articles about the effects the complete removal of the sex organs can have on both physical and mental development, as well as deterioration as they age. Hormones do more than control sex drive. We know this. If anyone is interested I can provide literature to support these claims, but for me, the ones that identified links between how quickly dogs deteriorated mentally as they aged and whether they were entire or not made my decision for me. It is much easier to remove his testicles should he develop testicular cancer than it is for me to address bone cancers, mental deterioration or any of the other conditions associated with the removal of their hormones.

    Finally, my response to the idea that dogs suffer as a result of being entire due to urges unfulfilled is still being refined and predominantly based on anecdotal evidence. The dog's closest ancestor is the wolf. Not all wolves mate, it is more important to them to support the pack than it is for them to all reproduce. Now dogs are not wolves, and we know that in feral populations, they all mate and some males will even wait whilst another male is mating to have a go next. This tells me that like humans, dogs are more opportunistic than their wolf cousins but at the same time, there's still some wolf in every dog (as I discovered again the other day when my dog started howling when I was trying to sing - I'm a terrible singer).

    I would say breed plays a huge role here. I own a Dobe/Rottie cross and my experience has been that even around females on heat, whilst he's certainly distracted, he's still with me. If I leave, he goes with me. For other dogs it may be different and if my dog was obsessed to the point where I lost all control around females on heat, that would probably make me think twice about desexing him. I know my dog has high prey drive, I would think it horribly cruel to deny him that and when it's been a while, he starts watching the ceiling obsessively at night time chasing the shadows of mosquitoes even. But he doesn't have that obsession with females. He will shake when he wants to chase prey and I am telling him not to, you can see what that costs him. But if that was a 10/10 response, around females on heat it's more of a 6/10. I have no doubt he'd love a girlfriend, but the drive he couldn't live without it being satisfied is his prey drive, not his sex drive. He also has very very high pack drive which has been remarked upon by many trainers and clubs, but this is what his breeder bred for which is very different from what most breeders breed for so again, my information on this subject is all anecdotal.

  10. #10

    Default

    Thank you all for the info.

    I hadn't considered incentivised desexing as a system to reduce animal agression, but, given the comments here it appears perhaps to have been the main reason for its introduction in Australia.

    As Beloz correctly guessed, I was looking for a link between unwanted pups and incentivised desexing.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •