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Thread: Owner 'unaware' of killer dog's breed

  1. #1
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    Default Owner 'unaware' of killer dog's breed

    THE owner of a dog who fatally mauled a four-year old girl says he would never have adopted the dog if he had known it was a pit bull cross.

    An inquest into the death of Melbourne toddler Ayen Chol today heard more details about the attack which prompted tougher state legislation for dangerous breeds such as pit bulls.

    Ayen died from head and neck wounds after the dog burst into her St Albans home, in Melbourne's western suburbs, in August last year from a house across the street.

    In a statement written shortly afterwards and read to the inquest today, Ayen's mother described how her daughter had grabbed onto her leg in fear when the dog ran inside, screaming once before falling silent.

    “The dog was crazy, biting anyone it could see,” Jacklin Ancaito said.

    “The dog would not let go of my child's face. He was just shaking my daughter.


    “There was blood all over the kitchen floor.”

    Ms Ancaito said she had tried unsuccessfully to rescusitate Ayen, blowing air into her mouth.

    “Whenever I close my eyes all I can see is what happened to my daughter,” she said.

    The dog's owner, Lazor Josevski, told the inquest he would have had the dog, called Rex, destroyed if it had shown any previous signs of aggression.

    “I wasn't aware that this particular dog was a particular breed that would be attacking people or killing them,” he said through a Macedonian interpreter.

    He was not aware of the dog's breeding background because it had been purchased by his son.

    “To tell the truth, if someone at the start had told me what breed of dog, what type of dog and what it was I never would have accepted it," Mr Josevski said.

    “Now I don't even want a cat at home, let alone a dog.”

    A magistrate last month fined Mr Josevski $11,000 after he pleaded guilty to owning a dog that attacked a person and caused serious injury, and owning an unregistered dog.

    Stronger laws allowing for more serious penalties, including up to 10 years imprisonment for owning a restricted breed dog which commits a fatal attack, have now passed the Victorian parliament but did not apply to his case.

    In a statement given to police shortly after Ayen's death, Mr Josevski said he had been watching Inspector Rex, the German crime show about a police dog, when yelling outside alerted him to the dog attack.

    “I was not expecting Rex would bite anyone,” he said in his statement.

    “We are good people and have brought this dog up in a good environment.

    “Rex was obedient....easily the most obedient dog our family has owned.”

    The inquest continues.

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news...-1226458965099

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  2. #2
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    “To tell the truth, if someone at the start had told me what breed of dog, what type of dog and what it was I never would have accepted it," Mr Josevski said.
    But they haven't established that it was any particular breed or that the breed it is / was makes it human aggressive.

    I still want to know how it got out. And I wouldn't mind knowing how much time those people spent making sure the dog was used to lots of different people - eg introducing it to the neighbours.

  3. #3

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    “We are good people and have brought this dog up in a good environment.

    “Rex was obedient....easily the most obedient dog our family has owned.”
    It's possible that some dogs, like some humans, become crazy and homicidal with nobody else at fault. This man could be telling the truth. However I doubt it. I've seen what a lot of people consider "good" and "obedient" dogs, and I wouldn't trust them around children or other dogs. The objective definition of a good and obedient dog is one that is trustworthy and gentle, and this doesn't always come naturally. Most dogs require a lot of work before they can be considered well-balanced and trustworthy.

    The ugly truth is that dogs, especially powerful high energy breeds, go crazy with boredom if you keep them confined for too long. It's most likely that this attack was the result of a powerful breed of dog that was denied its basic needs such as exercise and mental stimulation. It wanted to hunt some prey, and that poor little girl was the closest thing available.

    Unfortunately there are literally thousands of these dogs out there, who are imprisoned in backyards and neglected. Every single one of them is a bite risk. Culling them will not solve the problem - there will always be more to replace the ones that are euthanized by councils. The only possible solution I can think of is to heavily regulate them, so aquiring a dog capable of killing an average human is as difficult as buying a gun. All but the truly dedicated will be discouraged by the red tape.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mosh View Post
    It's possible that some dogs, like some humans, become crazy and homicidal with nobody else at fault. This man could be telling the truth. However I doubt it. I've seen what a lot of people consider "good" and "obedient" dogs, and I wouldn't trust them around children or other dogs. The objective definition of a good and obedient dog is one that is trustworthy and gentle, and this doesn't always come naturally. Most dogs require a lot of work before they can be considered well-balanced and trustworthy.

    The ugly truth is that dogs, especially powerful high energy breeds, go crazy with boredom if you keep them confined for too long. It's most likely that this attack was the result of a powerful breed of dog that was denied its basic needs such as exercise and mental stimulation. It wanted to hunt some prey, and that poor little girl was the closest thing available.

    Unfortunately there are literally thousands of these dogs out there, who are imprisoned in backyards and neglected. Every single one of them is a bite risk. Culling them will not solve the problem - there will always be more to replace the ones that are euthanized by councils. The only possible solution I can think of is to heavily regulate them, so aquiring a dog capable of killing an average human is as difficult as buying a gun. All but the truly dedicated will be discouraged by the red tape.
    Still that will only apply to those that wish to abide by the law. If I wanted an illegal gun I could probably have one on the way by the end of the week. The same would apply if I wanted to own a "pure" bred APBT. The breeds are banned and people still own them, regulating the powerful breeds won't change anything.

    We need better laws across the board that apply to all dog owners.

    There are a lot of things missing from this story. I want to know if an autopsy was done on the dog to rule out anything medical? Did these people taunt the dog day in day out which caused it to attack the first chance it got at freedom, or was it trained to be human aggressive.

    This guy says it was a loved pet, reports say it was caged in the back yard or something. I don't think we will ever know all the details though.

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  5. #5
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    I am fine with not realising till an incident, that you have a problem in your dog being aggressive.
    Ive yet to meet a dog owner, who is not curious as to what breed they own. Most mongrel owners, play guess games with a bit of this, and a bit of that. Surely you'd guess Pitt if your staffy appeared to of gotten rather large at some point?

    Dreadful situation for the girl and family.
    $11K compensation is pitiful for a face.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by jadielee87 View Post
    Still that will only apply to those that wish to abide by the law. If I wanted an illegal gun I could probably have one on the way by the end of the week. The same would apply if I wanted to own a "pure" bred APBT. The breeds are banned and people still own them, regulating the powerful breeds won't change anything.

    We need better laws across the board that apply to all dog owners.

    There are a lot of things missing from this story. I want to know if an autopsy was done on the dog to rule out anything medical? Did these people taunt the dog day in day out which caused it to attack the first chance it got at freedom, or was it trained to be human aggressive.

    This guy says it was a loved pet, reports say it was caged in the back yard or something. I don't think we will ever know all the details though.
    It will be hard to find the truth now - first Media, labels everything negatively, second the owner neglected the dog already after saying “To tell the truth, if someone at the start had told me what breed of dog, what type of dog and what it was I never would have accepted it," BLAMING THE BREED AGAIN.

    I am sure regulars in this forum will remember the thread where everyone is talking about having a license when owning a dog - I am still up for it. There should be a test making sure you can meet the requirements then cross reference the result of what breed suits you and your family. This way potential new owners, potential new breeders and existing breeders will and constantly educate them selves and others before adopting, rescuing or even purchasing a pup/dog.
    m<(o.o)>m

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