Page 30 of 44 FirstFirst ... 20282930313240 ... LastLast
Results 291 to 300 of 432

Thread: Bitch due to have pups? (unexpected complications which may arise)

  1. #291
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    Thanks for correcting me on the pig hunting, Sean.

  2. #292
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SE QLD
    Posts
    2,903

    Default

    I would look at how he treats his current dog and if you are happy with how he does maybe still ask for some money - it won't cover the vet costs but it will help a little. I guess you guys have informed him of all the complications and money that this litter has cost? I would probably go as far to ask for some assistance with the bills as well since you were both willing to mate your dogs originally.

    How were you planning on selling the pups and at what price?

    I love that little white pup that was crawling around on the tiles, it's adorable!

    There is no psychiatrist in the world like a puppy licking your face.

  3. #293

    Default

    I unfortunately have mostly seen the crappy end of pig hunting. Injured, abandoned, and dead dogs, overbred and undercared for dogs... I do know that some people are very dedicated and care for their hunting dogs well, but the majority of my own experience has all been with the other end of the spectrum.

    A big consideration may be the potential for your pup to be bred on from, with resultant care possily being much lower than your own standards are.

    The other issue I would have here is that good hunters normally take much care in breeding and selecting dogs. When cared for and trained properly they represent a big investment of time and money. Yet this person is claiming to be a responsible owner and or breeder of hunting dogs?

    Now Tips is not a proven hunting dog is she? If not, there is absolutely no guarantee that any of her pups will have hunting ability. I would think a person wantng to breed good hunters would look to a proven bitch of good hunting lines.

    In fact, if she was dumped at the pound, yet appears to be of a pigging type of crossbreed, she may well be a rejected hunting dog herself. So even if the sire of pups is an excellent hunting dog you have a good chance that the pups won't be.

    I'd personally be very dubious. One thing I have learned about placing pups is go with your instincts and f you have doubts, there is usually a very good reason.

  4. #294
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Marsden QLD
    Posts
    307

    Default

    Thanks guys for all your input
    We are going out there to their property late feb for their wedding...
    So i will be having a good look and susing it out for sure and no natty tips has never seen a pig and has never gone hunting and we have no idea really what her background is but as a family/kids dog she is wonderful and i couldnt ask anymore from her
    She is truly an amazing dog and with the right care and love im sure her pups would be as well,but regarless of breed i think that people can train dogs anyway they like if they bring them up to be aggresive and to hunt then thats what they will be....and vise versa

  5. #295
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    Sorry, I just have to comment on the "bring them up to be aggresive and to hunt". I don't know if you meant to link those two together, but I have to stress that using a dog for hunting does in no way result in them being aggressive. Have you ever seen those old English paintings of the wolfhounds lounging in front of the fire with the kids? Those dogs would have been used as hunting dogs. Just an example that I think of when I think 'hunting dogs'. My old wholfhound cross killed rabbits, possums and brought down a few kangaroos in her time. Yet I trusted her 100% around people and kids and even pet cats (no pet rodents though!). She wasn't very social with dogs she didn't know, but fine with little dogs and dogs she knew.

  6. #296
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Marsden QLD
    Posts
    307

    Default

    Beloz thanks for clearing that up for me I did mean it in the way it sounded, I thought for a dog to be a good hunter it would have to be aggressive was clearly my uneducated thoughts on this I often have wondered how they say a dog can be a great hunter but also great with people/ kids and so on, but I see from what u r saying that hunting is natural thing for these dogs to do? Therefor the two can be separated just like cattle dogs working cattle ( its natural ) but they don't chase and attack people well that's just changed my whole line of thought on these hunting dogs!! I do feel a little silly now to be honost for not seeing it that way first up

  7. #297
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    That's ok. After my wolfhound x brought down a kangaroo for the first time, I had people telling me that I had to put her down because the next time she might go for a child, etc. But she was the gentlest soul you can imagine.
    Last edited by Beloz; 01-13-2012 at 02:51 PM.

  8. #298

    Default

    Mine too are frequent hunters of rabbits, hares and foxes (the old name for my breed is Russian Wolfhound). But they are everyday gentle, family oriented and relaxed dogs, including around kids.

    But pig hunting requies tenacity that is normally specifically bred for. Otherwise people can try and teach it to dogs, but methods and success vary widely...

    Hunting skill is based upon instinct, and refined from there. If the instinct is not predominant in a family or bloodline, training it in will only get them so far. Pig hunting dogs of lesser skill and tenacity are more likely to be injured on a hunt.

  9. #299
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    4,292

    Default

    It's a really good point, Natty. Liss, I think one of the most important questions to ask the owner of the pup's father would be what would happen to the dog if the pup turns out to not be cut out for the job. I think it does sound a tad dodgy to get a pup for hunting without having any idea if they will be any good as hunting dogs, except for the fact that they have hunting breeds in their genetic make-up.

  10. #300
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    12,581

    Default

    I had to put some very careful and consistent and persistant training in to stop my cattle dog cross from herding joggers, bikes, cars...

    Hunting dogs will hunt what you train them to hunt. So if you want them to be good with people they need to spend a lot of time with friendly well behaved people when they're growing up.

    Puppies should stay with their mum until they are at least 8 weeks old.
    This lists the ideal. If you care about what happens to your puppies, make sure each person knows they can send it back to you if it doesn't work out, and follow up occasoinally - ask them to send pix of their puppies.
    What is a responsible companion animal breeder? - RSPCA Australia knowledgebase

    I'd be tempted to put a price equal to 1 puppies worth of the expenses you incurred (including the cost of desexing if you go that path). Especially for the unwanted stud owner.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •